Coastal Georgia Biographies

AIKEN, Frank D.
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 974.

            Frank D. Aiken, ship broker, Brunswick, Glynn Co., Georgia, son of Isaac and Fannie M. (Bryan) Aiken, was born on Hurd's Island, McIntosh Co., Georgia, 14 July 1861.  Mr. Aiken's father, of Irish lineage, was born in Winnsboro, South Carolina, came to Georgia in 1854, and after the war between the states went to Pensacola, Florida, where he now resides.  He enlisted in 1861, and was captain of Company B, 47th Georgia Regiment, in which capacity he served until 1864, when he was assigned to the special duty of collecting the taxes from five counties in Georgia.  His mother was of English descent, and was the daughter of P.M.  and Mary (Ellison) Bryan, of New Berne, North Carolina.  Mr. Aiken, when only thirteen years old and a poor boy, began life for himself.  What education he had was mainly obtained at Darien, Georgia.  In 1887 he embarked in the ship brokerage business in Brunswick, and in 1889 established planing mills.  In both these enterprises he has been eminently successful--prospered from the start--an has attained enviable honorable prominence locally and abroad, in the commercial world.  He is (and has been since 1888) a director of the board of trade, and has been a director of the Merchants' and Trader' Bank since its organization.  He was a member of the city board of aldermen two years; in January, 1894 he was elected county commissioner, and in January, 1895, was elected treasurer of the county.  In addition to the above he has held several other positions of public trust.  He is also second vice-president of the Brunswick Club, the only social club in the city.  He was first lieutenant of the  Brunswick Light Horse Guards until the troop was discharged for the purpose of reorganizing into a naval reserve artillery, which company of fifty-six men--the first and only company of Georgia's navy--he is now commander of.  Mr. Aiken's present important and highly honorable relations to the commercial interests of this prospectively great southern seaport, gives promise of an exceedingly brilliant future.  Mr. Aiken was married in January 1894, to Miss Frances B., daughter of Mallory P. King, and granddaughter of the distinguished Thomas Butler King, of ante-bellum fame, half a century ago one of the foremost of Georgia's statesmen.

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ARNOLD, W
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 974 & 975.

            W. Arnold, proprietor of "Ocean View House," St. Simons Island, Glynn Co., Georgia, is a son of Frederick Arnold, and was born in Prussia 4 March 1846.  His father was a native of Bromberg, Germany, where he spent his days, and where he died in 1849.  Mr. Arnold's father gave him a good education preparatory to his studying for the profession of an architect.  At the age of seventeen he commenced life for himself, without financial means.  In 1869 he came to the United States, and after a short stop in New York came to Tattnall Co., Georgia in 1870.  Later he determined to settle permanently on St. Simons Island.  Selecting the most eligible site, commanding and expansive "ocean view," he purchased thirty acres on the ocean beach, and has built and conducts in luxurious style and on the most liberal scale "Ocean View House," which is fast gaining the distinction of being one of the most attractive, delightful, and popular of the summer resorts on the south Atlantic coast.  Mr. Arnold was married in 1881 to Miss Anna F., daughter of Charles and Sarah (Hay) Stevens, natives respectively of Denmark and England.  Mr. Stevens came to this country when about twenty-two years old, and died in Fort Delaware during the war, when about fifty years old.  Mrs. Stevens (nee Hay) came to the United States when about eighteen years of age, is still living, and is about seventy-seven years old.  Mr.  and Mrs. Arnold were blessed with two children, Leopold and WinniebauldMr. Arnold is a member of the Lutheran, and Mrs. Arnold is a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church.

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BAUMGARTNER, R.C.
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 975.

            R.C. Baumgartner, meat merchant, Brunswick, Glynn Co., Georgia, fourth of ten children, is a son of John and Anna (Naven Schwander) Baumgartner, and was born in Bene, Switzerland 13 May 1858.  His father was a farmer and dairyman, who came to this country in 1867, and settled first in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, but in 1873 removed to South Pittsburg, Tennessee.  Here his father died in 1884, aged fifty-nine years; and his mother died in 1891, aged sixty-three years.  R.C. Baumgartner, when about twenty years of age, left the parental roof--his only capital a hopeful spirit, an honest purpose and a brave heart--to fight the battle of life.  His success demonstrates how wisely and how well he has used his capital.  In 1882 he came to Brunswick, which has since been his home.  By close attention to business, acting justly, and being scrupulously careful about his meats, he has established a good reputation and secured a permanent paying patronage.  Mr. Baumgartner was married 17 February 1883, to Miss Amelia, daughter of Van Hauten--himself a native of the United States, but whose father was a native of Holland and whose mother was a native of France.  The following children are the offspring of this union:  Carl Jackson, Lottie Amelia, Hugh Edward, and EllenMrs. Baumgartner is a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church.  Mr. Baumgartner has been exalted to the royal arch degree in Masonry and is treasurer of the local chapter.

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BARCLAY, Wyatt DeRevere
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" page 46

            WYATT DeREVERE BARCLAY was born in Clarksville, Ga., November 13, 1861, and is of English and Scotch parentage.  His father's name was Elihu Stuart Barclay, and his grandfather bore the same name.  His grandfather was one of three brothers who came to this country from Scotland some time during the seventeenth century and located at Lexington, Va.  He was descended from the house of Stuarts, and always retained the name of the house in his own cognomen.  Elihu S., father of our subject was born in Habersham County, Ga., and was educated for a lawyer, but abandoned the profession on the breaking out of war, and never thought it practicable to resume it, on account of the changed condition of affairs.  He was extensively engaged in the timber business, and was long inspector of timber in Darien.  He died in 1879.  Our subject's mother's maiden name was Helen Stanford, daughter of Col. John R. Stanford, who was a cousin of Senator Leland Stanford, of California, and Moses B. Stanford, of Brooklyn, N.Y.  Mr. Barclay is also related to the Charltons, of Georgia.  He is the third of five children, the others being John S., who is now dead, Rosa V., Zoa Ledger and Helen Eliza.  He is a self-educated man.  He located in Darien in 1876, and began the world as a printer.  He has worked at his trade constantly since, but was elected clerk of the superior court of McIntosh County in 1885, re-elected in 1887, and now holds that position.  As evidence of Mr. Barclay's popularity, it may be stated that he polled more votes than was ever polled before in the county for said position.  He is a Mason, member of Live Oak Lodge, No. 137, and is also a member of the Knights of Pythias and of the Episcopal Church.

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BERRIE, W.H.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 61 & 62

            W.H. BERRIE was born in Glenn [sic] County, Ga., October 31, 1846. He is a son of W.E. and Matilda Berrie. His father was born near Fernandina, Fla., August 26, 1805, while Florida was yet under the Spanish government. He afterwards moved to Camden County, Ga., where he was a planter for a number of years, moving to Glenn County in 1830. At this early date the Indians were yet plentiful and conflicts between them and the whites not infrequent. Mr. Berrie enlisted in a volunteer company of Georgians organized by Capt. Wilson of Camden County, in 1835, and went to Florida to help quell the Indian troubles of that date. He afterwards settled in Glenn County, Ga., where he has since lived. He is a man of remarkable vitality, being now more than eighty-three years of age and yet actively engaged in business. W.H. Berrie’s mother, whose maiden name was Matilda Piles, was a daughter of a well-to-do planter in Glenn County, and at one time he owned a great deal of land about the city of Brunswick. Mr. Berrie is one of a family of three children and the only one that ever reached maturity. He was going to school to a private preceptor when the war commenced but he quit school to join the army. In December, 1863, he enlisted in Company B, Fourth Georgia cavalry. He was in the engagement at Ocean Pond and saw some service on skirmish lines at other points. He was captured at Fort Gates, on the St. John’s river in Florida, April 1, 1864, and was taken to Fort Lafayette in New York harbor, where he was kept ten months, then transferred to Ft. Delaware, where he was kept till the war closed. He then returned to Savannah, and, having lost all the he had, literally began life afoot by walking from Savannah to Brunswick, his former home. He engaged in planting and in getting out timber, at which he succeeded fairly well for some years. He filled a clerkship in the drug business in Brunswick for different parties very successfully for a number of years. He was elected and re-elected ordinary of the county a number of times, having filled that office about ten years, during which time he filled some clerical positions with credit to himself. In 1876, he became connected with the Brunswick and Western Railroad and remained in its employ till 1882. He has been alderman and chairman of the council of the city of Brunswick and has always taken an active interest in her municipal affairs. He has held the office of sheriff of Glenn [sic] County four years, having been elected first in 1885. He was married January 26, 1871, to Miss Theresa Bailey, of Brunswick, who is a daughter of Henry Bailey an extensive rice planter of Camden County before the war. This union has been blessed with six children, all of whom are living and whose names are, in the order of their ages: Annie T., Harry O., Theodore W., Mary E., W.H. and Kenneth S. Referring to Mr. Berrie’s whole record, there can be no higher praise bestowed on it, than to say that he was never refused any position he asked for whether private or public.

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BIGGS, F.D.
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 975.

            F.D. Biggs, liveryman, Brunswick, Glynn Co., Georgia, is a son of Daniel and Olive (Collins) Biggs, natives of North Carolina, and was born at Antioch, North Carolina 31 July 1858.  Daniel was a son of William Biggs, who came from England to the United States when a boy.  Mr. Biggs was educated at Trinity College, North Carolina.  When he reached manhood he began life for himself, relying on his own resources and pluck for success.  He has lived in three states, and filled several public offices, having been a justice of the peace in Baldwin Co., Alabama, and Escambia Co., Florida, and is now successfully running a liver stable in Brunswick.  Mr. Biggs married Miss Cinderilla, daughter of Malcolm and Frances (Turner) Baggett--both Floridians--in 1881.  He is a member of the A.O.U.W.; the I.O.O.F.; the Knights of Pythias; the Knights of Honor; and of the Kappa Sigma fraternity.  Popular, obliging, and enterprising, he is sure to swell to handsome property his already large surplus.

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BLOUNT, Thomas Butler
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 75 & 76

            T.B. BLOUNT. Some time during the year 1700, McGregor Blount, accompanied by two brothers, left his home in Scotland and came to America, stopping on the Atlantic coast in one of the Carolinas. He was the captain of a coast wise vessel and followed the business of a seaman for some years up and down the Atlantic sea-board. Afterwards he located on St. Simon’s Island, Glenn [sic] County, Ga., where he married a Miss Basden, a descendant of the Mac Basdens, an old Scotch family. Of the offspring of this marriage one son, Edmond M. Blount, was born on St. Simon’s Island in 1810. Leaving there at the age of sixteen he went to Darien and began life there as a printer. He founded the Darien Gazette and was connected with it five or six years. During his residence there he was also city marshal and judge of the inferior court. He lived in Savannah a while, where he was engaged in the general brokerage business. He managed by industry and economy to accumulate quite a fortune, but as was the case of many others, it was all swept away during the war. He died in Darien in 1866. During his lifetime he was married to Miss Evalina G. Myers, by whom he had four children, namely: Edmond M., Jr., J.H., T.B., and Mary Elizabeth. The third of these, T.B. Blount, is the subject of our sketch. He was born in Darien, November 24, 1842, received a common school education, and in 1860 went to savannah to learn the machinist’s trade. He was there only three years when the war came on with all its unsettling effects. Young Blount enlisted immediately in a Confederate company called the “Republican Blues.” He was with this company six months, when he returned to Darien and joined a local company there called the “United Rebels.” He was afterwards also a member of the Fifth Georgia State Troops, and following this he joined the Liberty County independent troop of cavalry, with which he remained until the close of the war. The first battle of note that he was in was at Olustee, Fla. Returning to Georgia he was in a number of engagements, particularly in the northern part of the State. He was in the raid into Tennessee and Kentucky made for the purpose of cutting off Sherman’s supplies; crossed into Virginia and was in the battle of Saltville, where Burbage was defeated and the salt works saved. Returning to Georgia he met Kilpatrick at Bear Creek Station. Here his company fell into the rear of Sherman, who was then on his celebrated march to the sea, and was in daily conflict with him. On Sherman’s return to Savannah Mr. Blount’s company fell back, skirmishing along the line. He was in the battle of Bentonville and finally surrendered at Greenville, N.C., in the spring of 1865. Returning to Darien, Mr. Blount found the town burned and the people all refugeed; but with their gradual return business soon began to open up and Mr. Blount went to work in a sawmill, afterwards taking employment at the carpenter’s trade. On May 15, 1875, he was elected sheriff of his county and has continued in the office for fourteen years up to date.

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BLUE, Henry A.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 76-77 

            HENRY A. BLUE was born in McIntosh County, Ga., December 3, 1854, a son of Alexander and Angel (Younge) Blue.  The mother was born in Charleston, S.C., went to England in early life, where she was educated, returned to America at the age of twenty and was soon thereafter married.  Alexander Blue was born in Campbell County, Ga.  Both parents are still living, and reside in Fulton County, Ga.  They are members of the Episcopal Church.  Their children are:  Mary C., Alexander P., Leticia, Frederic C. and Henry A.  The father is a rice planter on the coast.  He graded about thirty miles of the East Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia R.R. and about the same distance on the Brunswick and L.B. Albany R.R.
            Henry A. Blue received his education chiefly from a private tutor.  He began business as a coal merchant, in 1872, in Macon, followed this occupation until when he was elected to fill an unexpired term in the city clerk’s office.  This was June 10, 1880.  Three candidates were in the field over whom he had a majority of seventeen votes.  In the fall of 1880 he ran a second time for the same office, and was elected by 350 majority.  He was re-elected in 1883 by the city council, also in 1885 and in 1887.  His continuous re-election gives unmistakable evidence of the efficiency and satisfaction rendered in his official capacity.  Mr. Blue is a member of the Knights of the Golden Rule.  In politics he is a Democrat.  In the fall of 1864 his sister, Mary C., a bright, lovely girl, just from school, died of cerebrospinal meningitis, at the age of twenty years.

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BORCHARDT, Samuel
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 77 & 78

            SAMUEL BORCHARD, attorney at law, was born in Macon, Ga., July 7, 1859. He is a son of Abram and Jeanette Borchardt. Abram Borchardt was born in Prussian-Polan, February 26, 1835. He is a son of Raphael and Bertha Borchardt. The former died in 1848 of the cholera, the latter several years after. Abram Borchardt immigrated to America in 1852, stopping successively in New York City, Albany, N.Y., Bridgeport and New Haven, Conn. He finally located in Macon, Ga., about the year 1863, where he remained for fifteen years, removing to Brunswick, where he has since resided. Jeanette Borchardt died January 31, 1861, at the early age of twenty-three, leaving as her only child Samuel. Abram Borchardt afterward married Miss Amelia Fendig, sister of his former wife, by whom he had these children: Benjamin, Bertha, Tilly, Raphael, Joseph, Rosa and Ida. Our subject was educated partly in Macon and partly in Brunswick. He finished his education at the high-school in Rensselaer, Ind. Leaving there in 1879, he located in Brunswick, and in 1880 began to read law in the office of Mershon & Smith. He was admitted to the bar the same year. He soon acquired a fair practice, and there being a vacancy in the office of solicitor of Glynn County, in 1882, he was appointed to fill out an unexpired term. Having given satisfaction, he was elected for a term of four years, and served out that term satisfactorily. Mr. Borchardt is a careful, painstaking lawyer, a hard student, and being yet a young man, has much in store for him. He is a member of the Hebrew order of “B’nai B’rith,” also of the Knights of Pythias. He has been secretary and president of the former order and keeper of the records and seals of the latter. He was married October 18, 1886, to Miss Tilly Fending, at Rensselaer, Ind., only daughter of Ralph Fendig, a prominent merchant of that place. He is a member of the Hebrew Church.

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BRANHAM, Alfred Iverson
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 90-92

            ALFRED IVERSON BRANHAM was born January 5, 1855, at Lumpkin, Stewart County, Ga. He is a son of I.R. and Julia (Iverson) Branham. He is of Scotch-Irish stock on his father’s side and Danish on his mother’s. Both the Branhams and Iversons are old and distinguished families in Georgia. The founder of the Branham family in America came to Virginia and settled some time in 1700. From there the grandfather of Alfred Iverson Branham emigrated to Georgia about the year 1800 and settled in Eatonton, which has since been recognized as the family homestead. I.R. Branham, father of Alfred I., was born at Eatonton in 1826 and still lives there. He was educated for a lawyer and practiced some years, but his hearing becoming bad he quit the profession and began teaching school. He has been teaching now more than forty years and has been one of the most successful educators in the State.
            Through his father Mr. Branham is connected with a number of other well known Georgia families, prominent among them being the Coopers, Nisbits, Boykins, Richardsons, Wingfields and Goodes. The mother of Alfred Iverson Branham was a daughter of the Hon. Alfred Iverson, judge, congressman and prominent politician of ante bellum days. He will be remembered as the colleague of Robert Tombs in the United States Senate at the time Georgia seceded, and, excepting Mason and Slidell, was probably the bitterest of the Southern members in congress in his denunciations against the North. Nor was he slow to act when the time came to fight. Although too old to enlist, he nevertheless shouldered his shotgun, and, marching to the front offered his services as a volunteer soldier.
            Mr. Branham has three sisters and two brothers now living: Mrs. Charles Lane, of Macon; Mrs. Carrie Means, of Houston County; Mrs. L.G. Walker, of Chattanooga, Tenn., whose husband is editor of the Chattanooga Times; I.R. Branham, Jr. in the dry-goods business at Memphis, Tenn., and R.E.L. Branham, of Brunswick. Mr. Branham received his primary education at Brownsville, Tenn. He then attended Bethel College at Russellville, Ky., two years, and on leaving there went to the University of Tennessee, at Knoxville, which institution he attended one year. He holds the degree of A.M. from the Mercer University of Macon. After leaving college Mr. Branham went to New York city, where he spent considerable time engaged in newspaper work. He returned to Georgia in 1877 and began to teach school; taught private schools for two or three years; was then elected professor of the sub-freshmen class in the University of Georgia. He held this position for some time and continued to do some newspaper work at intervals. Liking the newspaper field better than the class-room he resigned his professorship to accept a position on the Atlanta Constitution. On quitting this position he was called to the city editorship of the Macon Telegram. Afterwards he returned to the Constitution’s staff and continued on that paper until he was called to Savannah to accept the position of associate editor of the Savannah News. It is a remarkable fact that although Mr. Branham has probably done as much newspaper work as any man of his age he yet never sought a position on any paper. On account of the failure in his wife’s health Mr. Branham resigned his position on the Morning News in July, 1887, and moved to Brunswick, where he took charge of the public schools. He organized the present system in the schools there and the citizens speak in highest praise of his work as an educator. Mr. Branham married Miss Lucy Turner, at Eatonton, December 24, 1877. This estimable lady died at Brunswick, December 20, 1887, leaving two children—Louise Julia and Lucy Turner. Mr. Branham is a Mason and an active member of the Baptist Church.

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BRANTLEY, Benjamin Daniel
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" page 93

            HON. BENJAMIN D. BRANTLEY, of Blackshear, Ga., was born in Laurens County, Ga., January 14, 1832. His parents were Benjamin and Elizabeth (Daniel) Brantley. The father was born and reared in North Carolina, and moved from there to Georgia, where he married the mother of the subject of this sketch. His occupation was that of a planter, which he pursued with considerable success up to the time of his death, which occurred when he was yet a young man. The mother was reared in Laurens County, Ga., and bore her husband six children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the youngest. His youth was spent in Montgomery and Laurens counties, Ga., where he attended the common schools. In 1858 he removed to Blackshear and engaged in the mercantile business on a small scale, the firm being known as “Brantley & Douglas,” until 1860, when Mr. Brantley purchased his partner’s interest. In 1870 Judge W.M. Sessions became a partner and the firm was known as “Brantley & Co.” In 1875 Mr. Brantley bought the interest of Judge Sessions. The business has prospered, owing to Mr. Brantley’s business sagacity, and it is the largest mercantile house in Blackshear. Mr. Brantley is the wealthiest man in Pierce County. In 1863 he joined the Confederate service as a private in the Fourth Georgia cavalry, but served only a short time. In January, 1864, he was elected clerk of the superior and inferior courts of Pierce County and served until 1868. In 1873-74 he represented his county in the legislature and has been treasurer of Pierce County since 1876. Mr. Brantley is a self-made man, and considering the disadvantages of his earlier days, he deserves great credit for his success in life.
            August 10, 1856, he was married to Miss Jeanette McRae, daughter of Christopher and Christian (McCrimmon) McRae. She bore him seven children, viz.: Christian E., Margaret L., William G., Archibald P., Benjamin D., Jr., John T. and Jennette H. His son, William G., is the present senator from the third Georgia senatorial district, and represented Pierce County in the Georgia house of representatives in 1884-85. Mr. Brantley is a member of the F. and A.M.

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BRANTLEY, W.G.
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 975 & 976.

            W.G. Brantley, solicitor general of Brunswick circuit court, is the son of B.D. and Jeanette (McCrae) Brantley, natives respectively of Laurens and Montgomery Counties, Georgia, and was born in Blackshear, Pierce Co., Georgia, 18 September 1860.  His father was a merchant and died leaving a very prosperous business which had been continued as "The A.P. Brantley Co."  His mother is still living at Blackshear.  Her parents emigrated to this country from Scotland, locating in Montgomery County.  Mr. Brantley was liberally educated in the public schools and at the university of Georgia.  He read law under Hon. John C. Nichols, Blackshear, was admitted to the bar in 1882, and was at once accepted as a partner by his Blackstonian preceptor, under the firm name of Nichols & Brantley.  Two years later he retired from the firm and practiced by himself.  In 1884 he represented Pierce County, and afterward the third senatorial district in the general assembly.  In 1888 he was elected solicitor-general of Brunswick circuit and reelected in 1892.  When a member of the senate he took a very prominent part in the passage of the telegraph bill of 1887, and in opposition to the sale of the Western & Atlantic railroad.  As solicitor-general he has been exceptionally successful, and is considered one of the ablest of the state's officials.  Mr. Brantley also stands high as a practical business man.  The best evidence of the estimation in which his professional ability and statesmanlike qualities are held, lies in the fact that he was tendered the judgeship of Brunswick circuit, and other equally honorable official positions.  His name was also mentioned in connection with the seat in the United States senate made vacant by the death of Senator A.H. Colquitt.  these very flattering manifestations of appreciation, however, fail to inflate or unbalance him.  He is as unassuming as his thousands of admiring friends regard him preeminently able.

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BRIESENICK, John Ferdinand Ernest
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 118-119

            E. BRIESENICK, Brunswick, Ga., is the founder of the Briesenick iron and brass works, on Bay street, and general merchandising store at 175 Newcastle street.  The firm make [sic] prompt estimates on all standard machinery, keep in stock iron and steel pipe and fittings, Babbitt metal, boiler rivets, rubber packing, belting and hose; they also make a specialty of shafting, pulleys and hangers, and are agents for Selden’s direct acting steam pump, and for Tanner and Delaney steam engines and boilers, and also for cotton presses, saw-mills and cane-mills.  E. Briesenick was born in Berlin, Germany, August 28, 1831, and is the eldest of the three surviving children born to William and Dorothea (York) Briesenick, the other two children being Augusta and Robert.  He learned the machinist’s trade in his native land, and came to the United States in 1850 or 1851, landing in New York city; worked there at his trade six months, and then went to Bridgeport, Conn., where he was foreman of a machine shop until 1866, when he went to Butler County, Pa., where he established and conducted a hotel for three and a half years, and also served as justice of the peace.  He next returned to Bridgeport, Conn., and for a short time worked at his trade; then went to Birmingham, Conn., where he had charge of a machine and tool shop three years; his next position was the charge of the tool department of a brass mill in Ansonia, Conn., which position he held until 1869, when he moved to Brunswick, Ga., and established his present business.  In 1854 he married Anna Trueman, who became the mother of three children—Charles William, Dorothea and Robert E.  The eldest, Charles William, graduated in medicine from the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Keokuk, Iowa, in 1883; he is married, has two children, Jennie and Dorothea, and is now located at Costello, Pa., practicing his profession.  Dorothea Briesenick married George Shelton, and has three children—Earnest, Robert and ClaraRobert, the third child of our subject, is the business manager of, and a partner in the iron and brass works, and is a young man possessed of fine business qualifications.  Mrs. Anna Briesenick died in 1865; our subject next married Sarah A. Shelton, who died in 1883, and in August, 1887, Mr. Briesenick married Elsa von Beglerbeg.

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BURFORD, Hugh
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 976 & 977.

            Hugh Burford, physician and surgeon, Brunswick, Glynn Co., Georgia, son of Dr. William B. and Laura (Bryant) Burford, natives, respectively, of South Carolina and Georgia, was born in Hall County, Georgia, 2 June 1852.  During his childhood his parents removed to Ringgold, Catoosa Co., Georgia, where his father enjoyed a large and lucrative practice.  Here, in the schools of Ringgold, was laid the foundation of his education; the higher or collegiate education contemplated was cut off by reverses consequent upon the war between the states.  After the battle of Chickamauga the family refugeed to Orange County, Florida, where young Burford's education was completed under the private tutorage of Rev. Dr. Bell, distinguished for his superior ability as an educator and for his strict religious discipline.  After a brief experience in mercantile pursuits, he, with J. Ira Gore as a partner, established and published the Florida "State Journal," a weekly paper at Cedar Keys, Florida.  Later he sold his interest in the enterprise to his partner and began the study of medicine under the preceptorship of his father, and in 1875 took his first course of medical lectures at the Savannah Medical College.  During the yellow fever epidemic in Savannah in 1876 several of the professors fell victims to its ravages and the college exercises were suspended, so that he did not graduate until 1879, when he graduated at the head of his class.  He took an active part and rendered efficient service during the epidemic until prostrated by yellow fever, and then for four years--1877-80--was assistant to the surgeon in the marine hospital, enjoying a good private practice in the city, beside discharging the duties of demonstrator of anatomy in Savannah Medical College, to which he was elected 1879.  Family and estate matters at his home in Florida necessitated his going there, thus breaking up the prosperous future promised in Savannah.  He spent about a year in assisting his widowed mother in settling up his father's business and then, in 1882, came to Brunswick, which has since been his home.  While Dr. Burford pays special attention to gynecology and obstetrics he practices in every branch of his profession, in which he has been phenomenally successful, enjoys and extensive practice, ranks among the most eminent of the profession in the state and has attained an enviable national reputation.  He is by general consent regarded as the most popular and prominent physician in Brunswick.  He is president of the board of health, and in that capacity devoted his untiring efforts to alleviate suffering during the yellow fever epidemic of 1893.  he is acting assistant surgeon in the marine hospital service at Brunswick; member of the Georgia State Medical Association; of the National Association Railway Surgeons of the United States.  He is also the medical examiner at Brunswick for the following named insurance companies:  New York Life, New York Mutual, Equitable, New Jersey Benefit Mutual, Pennsylvania Mutual, Manhattan, Phoenix, Massachusetts Benefit, United States, Maryland Life, Fidelity and Casualty Company, Massachusetts Mutual Benefit, and several others.  Dr. Burford was married in July, 1883, to Miss Mary K.--born in Tarrytown, New York--daughter of Edward M. and Frances (Rathbone) Hopkins of Savannah, and to them three children have been born:  Hugh aged eleven; Dorothy aged five; and an infant not named.  Dr. Burford is a member of the I.O.O.F., a master Mason, and a communicant of the Protestant Episcopal Church.  Mrs. Burford is a devoted member of the Presbyterian Church.

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BURFORD, R.E.L.
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 976.

            R.E.L. Burford, M.D., physician and surgeon and United States sanitary inspector, marine hospital service, Brunswick, Glynn Co., Georgia, is a son of John and Almeda (Thompson) Burford, and was born in Anderson Co., Kentucky, 2 March 1861.  His father, who is a breeder of and dealer in blooded horses and cattle in the famous "blue grass region of Kentucky," is of English and his mother of Scotch descent.  Dr. Burford graduated from Georgetown college, Georgetown, Kentucky, and also from the medical university of Louisville, Kentucky, and passed the best examinations in all the branches taught, receiving the class honors.  He also made an excellent record in his literary studies.  One month after graduation Dr. Burford located and opened an office in Brunswick, Georgia, and at once gained the confidence and esteem of the people.  In September, 1893, unexpectedly and wholly unsolicited by him, he was appointed United States sanitary inspector, marine hospital service at Brunswick, Georgia, and placed in charge of the government station at that port.  He has rapidly risen in public estimation and attained to an enviable and well-deserved reputation in his profession.  He has already won by his demonstrated superior ability, a large lucrative patronage.  In the highest and most honorable sense of the term, he is a gentleman, and is sure to win his way to professional eminence.  He is a member of the I.O.O.F.

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BURROUGHS, Dr. William Berrien
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 977-982.

            Dr. William Berrien Burroughs, of Brunswick, Glynn Co., Georgia, bears an old and distinguished name in Georgia.  He can probably trace his ancestry back as far on both sides as any man in the state.  The antiquity and prominence of the Burroughs name are seen from the following heraldic records:  "The first attempt to reach China by this route (Nova Zembla) was made by the Muscovy or Russian company in 1553, under Sir Hugh Willoughby in three ships, with Richard Chanceller as pilot major.  The leader and two vessels with seventy men were lost on the coast of Lapland; the third ship, under command of Capt. Stephen Burroughs with Chancellor, reached the White Sea safely and commercial relations were established with Russia.  In 1556 Capt. Stephen Burroughs had chief command of another expedition.  He doubled Cape North, touched at Nova Zembla, discovered the island Wygatz and Wygatz Straits, which separate Nova Zembla from the then supposed continent, and reached north latitude seventy degrees, three minutes--a higher point than had been reached by any previous navigator.  He returned to England and published an account of his observations.  He was the first who observed the declination of the magnetic needle.  Following is the coat of arms as given in the best books on heraldry:  "'Azure, a Bend wavy argent between two Fleurs de lis Ermine,' and was assigned and granted by Robert Cooke, of Clarencieux, 27 January 1586, in the twenty-ninth year of Queen Elizabeth, to William Burroughs, Esq., clerk and comptroller of the queen's navy, son of Walter Burroughs, Esq., descended from the Burroughs at Northam, near Barnstable in the county of Devon."  Sir John Burroughs was grandson of William Burroughs, of Sandwich Kent, by the daughter of Basil Gasell of Newkirk, Bralant, and garter king of arms.  He received a classical education and afterward studied law at Grey's Inn.  In 1623 he was appointed keeper of records in the tower of London.  In June of the same year the earl marshal, to whom he was secretary, appointed him herald extraordinary.  On 30 December of the same year he was made king of arms at Arundel House in the Strand.  He received the favor of knighthood 17 July 1624.  In 1634 he was made garter principal.  He attended his sovereign, Charles I, when he went to Scotland to be crowned in 1633.  On 14 April 1636, he obtained a grant to entitle him to the fees of his office of garter while employed beyond the sea in the king's special service.  He died 21 October 1643, leaving two sons and two daughters.  His son John was knighted by Charles II.  The family has continued in London to the present day.  Silas M. Burroughs, the head of the largest drug house in the world--Burroughs, Wellcome & Co., of London--is one of this family.  John is a family name, for we find in English history John Burroughs, a divine who died in 1386.  He was D.D. of Cambridge, rector of Collingham, Nottinghamshire; appointed 1 July 1384, to the post of chancellor of his university.  Another John, a Benedictine who flourished in 1340, was the author of some books on travels.  The progenitor of the family in America was John, born in England, Dorsetshire County, in 1617, and came to America and landed at Salem, Massachusetts, about 1642.  He was a member of the long parliament that assembled 3 November 1640, which was dissolved by Cromwell, and with many others fled from England to escape religious prosecution.  He moved from Salem to Long Island, New York, early in the forties.  Long Island was then occupied by the Camassee Indians.  He was one of the original settlers of Middleburg in 1652 and paid his share of "the Indian rate," one pound, ten shillings, in 1656.  On 13 March 1662, he was elected town clerk and clerk of the court.  He was one of the seven patentees of Newtown in 1666.  Being a leading man and skillful penman, quite a rare accomplishment in those days, he was continued in office as town clerk for eleven years, and at his death, in August 1678 (his will is on record in New York and an original copy is still in possession of the family of Mr. George Wyckoff Burroughs), his eldest son was elected to fill his position and held the office for many years.  His family continue in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Connecticut.  Benjamin Burroughs, the grandfather of our subject, and the great-great-great-grandson of John, was the first to bring the name south.  He was born at Newtown, Long Island, 31 Marc 1779, and died at Savannah, Georgia 14 April 1837, aged fifty-seven.  He moved to Augusta, Georgia, thence to Savannah, and on 2 July 1799, at the age of twenty, married in Savannah Miss Catharine Eirick, daughter of Alexander Eirick, who was a member of the colonial parliament.  Isabella, her sister, married Dimas Ponce, and Ruth, a younger sister, married Francis Harney Welman, an officer of the British navy, in January 1807, whose daughter, Mrs. John H. Reid, of Savannah, a charming and elegant lady of the old school, survives him.  Catharine Eirick's mother's maiden name was Ruth Erwin, daughter of Christopher Erwin, born in Antrim County, Ireland, 8 January 1754.  One sister of Ruth Erwin married Capt. Loyer, of the French Army, from whom are descended the Davants, of Savannah, Georgia; another sister married Gov. Jared Irwin, her cousin, the letter being changed some generations before from I to E on account of religious differences.  Benjamin Burroughs, prominent as a cotton and commission merchant in the city of Savannah, was largely interested in the steamship "Savannah".  His partner--Mr. Sturges--and himself owned one-third of the ship, and they shipped cotton to Liverpool on her first voyage.  Ocean navigation by steam was inaugurated by the voyage of the "Savannah" in 1819 from Savannah to England and Russia; the paddles were made of canvas and the arms of iron, and the wheels were so arranged that they could be dismounted at pleasure, and it was adapted to the use of steam or sails, according to circumstances.  She left Savannah 26 May 1819, and reached Liverpool after a passage of twenty-five days, during which the engine was employed eighteen days.  Benjamin Burroughs was and elder in the Independent Presbyterian Church in Savannah, and gave $5,000 to assist in building the same in 1817.  His children were Joseph H., merchant, Savannah; William Howe, planter in Florida who married Ann McLeod, afterward moved to Savannah and was a cotton merchant, one child survives him--Joseph Hallett; Benjamin Burroughs, Presbyterian minister at Veronberg, Georgia, married Rosa Williams--three children living--James P. Burroughs, Miss Rosa Burroughs, and Mrs. Theo. Livingston, of Jacksonville, Florida; Dr. Henry Kollock Burroughs, physician, and many years mayor of Savannah, married Ella Dessaussure, of Charleston, South Carolina, who survives him, and has several daughters; Oliver S., planter, of Tallahassee, Florida, married Ann C. Maxwell--two sons B.M. and E.W. Burroughs, survive him; Elizabeth Reed married Dr. John S. Law, of Cincinnati, Ohio; their children are John Hugh, Benjamin, Frank, Wallace, Charles Green, and one daughter.  Catharine, daughter of Benjamin Burroughs, married Charles Green of Savannah, Georgia.  Joseph Hallett Burroughs was the eldest son of Benjamin, and father of William Berrien Burroughs (our subject), was born in Savannah 30 June 1803, was a graduate of Yale college and entered the cotton business with his father.  On 26 June 1828, he was married at Savannah to Miss Valeria Gibbons Berrien.  On his mother's side the name is none the less known or distinguished.  The Berriens are an old French family and the seat of their ancestors was Berrien, a considerable town in the department of Finisterre; their ancestor was a Huguenot, who, during the civil wars of France was forced to flee and take refuge in Holland.  Cornelius Jansen Berrien was the first of the name that emigrated to this country, and was the progenitor of the family here.  He settled at Flatbush, Long Island, New York, in 1669, and married Jeanette, daughter of Jan Stryker, and being a person of character and education, he enjoyed offices in the town government, and was a deacon in the Dutch church.  After his death he was succeeded by his son John, who held several positions of honor and trust.  Cornelius, a son of John, married Sarah Hallette, and lived on Berrien's Island, near Long Island.  He was the grandfather of William Berrien, D.D., rector of the Trinity Church, New York, for thirty-three years, in which parish he ministered in holy things for fifty-two years, and married Jane, daughter of Elias B. Dayton, of Elizabethtown, New Jersey.  Peter was a son of Cornelius, was a surveyor by profession and became a large land-owner and served several years as supervisor.  He gave the land upon which the first Dutch Church in Newton was erected.  Cornelius was a son of Peter.  He was a prominent man--elder in the church, magistrate, etc.  His son John was chosen on the committee of safety in 1775.  John Berrien, son of Peter, married Margaret Eaton; he lived at Rocky Hill, Somerset Co., New Jersey.  He was one of the judges of the supreme court of judicature of that state (then colony).  Gen. Washington was visiting his family, and made it his headquarters, and is was from the door-steps of this house that Washington's farewell address was delivered to his army; the address is familiar to every schoolboy.  Their children were Ionna, who married a Mr. Spencer of Maryland, whence Spencer Baird; Valeria, who married a Mr. Le Conte, whence Dr. Joseph and Dr. John Le Conte, and John, who emigrated to Georgia in 1775; at fifteen years of age he was lieutenant in the First Georgia Regiment; at seventeen he was captain in the same command; at eighteen he was appointed by Gen. Lachlan McIntosh brigade-major in the northern army; he was conspicuous in the battles of Monmouth and Valley Forge, and in several other engagements, and continued in service until the close of the war.  He married Miss Margaret MacPherson, of Philadelphia, daughter of Capt. John MacPherson, and sister of Gen. Wm. MacPherson, of Revolutionary fame, and sister of Capt. John MacPherson, aid-de-camp to Gen. Montgomery, with whom he fell at the battle of Quebec, thus connecting the Berriens with that well-known family.  Maj. John Berrien's second wife was Williamana Moore.  Their children were Dr. Richard McAllister Berrien, who married Elizabeth Deloney, of St. Mary's, Georgia, about 1819; Martha, the only child of that marriage who still survives married Dr. Hugh O'Keefe Nesbitt, of Augusta, Georgia, who died in October, 1855.  Their children Robert Taylor Nesbitt, present commissioner of agriculture, who married Rebecca L. Saffold, eldest child of Dr. Thos. Saffold and Mary Harris, of Madison, Georgia; Eliza B. who married Dr. Bayard L. McIntosh, of Trenton, New Jersey, and Mary Eleanor, who first married Col. Thos. B. Brown, of Montgomery, Alabama, and afterward Col. John Screven, of Savannah; one daughter, Lila McIntosh Screven, who married Samuel C. Atkinson, attorney-at-law at Brunswick.  Col. Thos. M. Berrien married Virginia Pepper (nee Mabry), of Camden Co., Georgia.  Weems Berrien married Miss Noble of Rome, Georgia.  Julia Married John Whitehead, of Jefferson County.  Sarah married James Whitehead, of Jefferson County.  Ruth married Samuel Dowse, of Burke County.  Eliza married a Mr. Casey, of Columbia County.  John MacPherson Berrien, son of Maj. John Berrien, and grandfather of our subject, was born at the residence of his paternal grandfather at Rocky Hill, near Princeton, New Jersey, 23 August 1781.  He married Elizabeth, daughter of Nicholas Anciaux, quartermaster-treasurer of the French Royal Deux Ponts Regiment, whose commission, signed by Louis XVI, is now in the possession of Dr. BurroughsNicholas Anciaux was born on Frankfort-on-the-Main in Germany.  His father was Chevalier DeWhiltteiseno.  The children by this marriage who survive him are Valeria G., who married Joseph Hallett Burroughs; Eliza A. who married Chancellor J.P. Carroll, of South Carolina; Wiltielmina married Henry Williams, of Savannah, Georgia; Louisa G. married Gen. Francis S. BartowJudge Berrien married a second time--Miss Sarah Hunter, of Savannah, Georgia.  The children of this marriage are Harriet, who married Theodore Cone; Sarah, who married Dr. A.J. Semmes; of New Orleans, Louisiana; Catharine, who married Maj. Geo. W. Anderson, of Savannah; and L. Cecile, who married Miss Rosa Falligant, and is now living in Jacksonville, Florida--the only son to bear his name.  Judge John MacPherson Berrien, L.L. D., graduated at Princeton College, and from this institute received his degree of bachelor of arts at the early age of fifteen.  After serving as recorder of the city of Savannah and solicitor-general, he was elected state judge at twenty-nine years of age, and served ten years.  He was elected state senator, and was United States senator 1825-1829; United States attorney-general 1829-1831, and a third time elected United States senator 1847-1852.  He declined the mission to England, which was offered him by President Jackson.  (Commodore John M. Berrien, born in Georgia, and appointed from this state in the United States Navy commandery, navy yard at Norfolk, 1865, was a member of this family.)  William Berrien Burroughs was born in Savannah, Georgia, 7 April 1842, and is the son of Joseph H. and Valeria G. (Berrien) Burroughs.  He is the seventh son in a family of ten children, only four of whom survive, the other three being Richard B., prominent physician in Jacksonville, Florida, and surgeon of the F.C. & P. R.R.; John W., a lawyer in Savannah, Georgia; and Charles J., a physician and four years health officer of Jacksonville, Florida.  William B., received his primary education in Savannah and entered Oglethorpe University, near Milledgeville, Georgia in 1859.  At the breaking out of the war between the states he left college and joined the Randolph Rangers as a private.  This company with others, formed the 7th Georgia Cavalry, and became a part of Gen. P.M.B. Young's brigade, Hampton's division, army of northern Virginia.  He was made first sergeant of Company G of this regiment--going with it through the battle on Borden's Plank Road, Dinwiddie Courthouse, Stony Creek, and other points, and received his parole at Appomattox.  At the close of the war he studied medicine with Dr. R.D. Arnold of Savannah, and graduated from Savannah Medical College in March, 1867.  He moved to Camden County, Georgia, where he practiced his profession for fifteen years, doing a large and successful business, and accumulating quite a fortune.  In 1881 he moved to Brunswick, Georgia, and invested his money in real estate, bonds, shipping, and other enterprises that were for the benefit and advancement of the city.  He also opened a real estate and insurance office.  he is today the oldest real estate and insurance agent in the city, and is recognized as an authority on all real estate matters.  He has erected over 100 small cottages for home-seekers.  As an evidence of the interest that he takes in the development of the section, as well as the confidence in which he is held by his fellow citizens and business associates, we mention that he is a director in the National Bank of Brunswick, and in the Brunswick Savings and Trust Company; is a director in the board of trade and chairman of statistics; a director in the Kennon Cotton Factory and a director in the Brunswick Foundry and Machine Manufacturing Company.  He is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and has been grand vice-chancellor of Georgia.  He was appointed a delegate by Gov. W.J. Northen to the national Nicaragua Convention which assembled at St. Louis in June 1892, also to the national Nicaragua Convention which assembled in New Orleans in 1893, and at each convention was elected executive committeeman for his state by the Georgia Delegation.  On 17 January 1872, Dr. Burroughs married Miss Elizabeth P.W. Hazlehurst, eldest daughter of Maj. Leighton Wilson Hazlehurst, who married Miss Mary J. McNish of Savannah, Georgia.  He was a large and successful rice planter on the Satilla River, Camden County, and had his summer seat at Waynesville, Georgia.  Dr. Burroughs has six children:  Mary McNish, Lilla H., Josephine H., William B., Leighton H. and Mac H.  Before closing this article we will mention some of the worthy members of his family who reside in the north, among whom was Stephen Burroughs, born 1729, strictly a cold water man, and never sick a day in his life.  About 1755 he planted the germ at Rocky Hill on the Pequannock Harbor, Connecticut, by starting his grist-mill and engaging in mercantile pursuits.  It was he who planted the corner-stone of the now wealthy and growing city of Bridgeport, Connecticut.  He was an active Whig, and raised and equipped a military company called Householders during the Revolution, of which he was elected captain.  He was for many years a justice of the peace and a representative in the general assembly, and owned the parish grist-mill called the Burroughs Mill that stood where the Pequannock woolen mills now stand.  He invented the system of Federal money as now used in the United States, which was adopted by congress in 1790.  Up to that time all business was done under the old English system of pounds, shillings, pence, and farthings, two of which last-named made of copper, and four of which made a penny.  After completing his system he carried it to the Hon. William Samuel Johnson, who, impressed with its simplicity and great convenience, caused it to be brought before congress in 1784, when he was a member of that body, where it was considered, but nothing done at that time except an enactment under which Connecticut and Massachusetts began in 1785 to coin copper cents, for many years denominated copper pennies.  In 1792 the dollar was made the unit in money, and its coinage established by law.  he was quite proficient in astronomy and was blind for twenty years before his death.  He was buried at Bridgeport, Connecticut.  Upon his tombstone is inscribed this epitaph:  "Stephen Burroughs, Esq.  A man distinguished by his industry and his talents and acquirements.  Self-taught and original, he explored the vast field of mathematical and astronomical sciences beyond all the efforts of a Cassini or Newton, and made discoveries of the most useful and astonishing nature.  But in consequence of his blindness his discoveries are lost to the world.  He died Aug. 2, 1817, aged eighty-eight."  From lecture of Rev. Samuel Orcutt, historian, delivered before the Fairfield County Historical Society, Capt. Stephen Burroughs and His Times.

 

NOTES:  Rockingham was owned by Judge John Berrien and passed to his wife, Margaret, when he committed suicide in 1771.  Rockingham served as Washington's last war-time headquarters, however, as is popularly believed, he did not address the troops there.  He wrote the Farewell Orders to the Armies which were delivered to Newburgh, NY.  Washington addressed his officers in New York City in December 1783 but gave no such speech at Rockingham.  He only had a few aides and about 20 soldiers camped outside during his stay.--Anne Woolley  Communications Coordinator for The Rockingham Association

John Berrien & Margaret Eaton's children were:  John, Elizabeth Eaton, William, Samuel, Mary, & Thomas.  Those listed above, might be Margaret Eaton's siblings.----Anne Woolley  Communications Coordinator for The Rockingham Association

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BUSH, M.M.
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 982.

            M.M. Bush, Brunswick, Glynn Co., Georgia, is a large and prosperous manufacturer of tools used in the turpentine industry.  He is a son of John and Malcy (Russ) Bush, born respectively in Duplin and Bladen Counties, North Carolina, and was born in Bladen County, North Carolina 11 February 1842.  his father followed farming and merchandising until he died, at seventy years of age, and his wife died when about sixty-five years old.  Mr. Bush's grandfather was of Irish, and his grandmother of German descent.  The Bush family, as far back as they can be traced, were farmers and merchants.  Mr. Bush enlisted 11 June 1861, and was captured at the fall of Roanoke Island.  He was sent home on parole.  After remaining at home six months, he reenlisted, was made a non-commissioned officer, and in 1864 had the misfortune to be captured again at Cold Harbor, Virginia.  This time he was sent first to Point Lookout and afterward to Palmyra, New York, where he was kept in captivity until the close of the war.  He was twenty-eight years of age when he started to see what the world had in store for him, and he has already found much that it had.  he is now industriously and energetically working for the larger remainder he feels encouraged to hope and work for.  And he has many willing friends lending him their aid.  he now owns a one-third interest in an eighty-acre tract of Florida orange land, twenty-eight acres in grove, fifty unplanted; a one-fourth interest in a $40,000 wharf property, a steam tug (the "Amanda"), a small plantation in North Carolina, and a fine home residence in Brunswick.  Mr. Bush was married in 1882 to Miss Georgia, daughter of Malcolm McCrae, who bore him one child, when she died.  In 1892 he married Miss Jackie, a daughter of John Brown, of Atlanta, by whom he has had two children, twins:  Robert M. and EdnaMr. Bush is a master Mason, and himself and Mrs. Bush are Methodists, he being one of the stewards of the church.

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CLARK, William N.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 171-172

            WILLIAM N. CLARK, manufacturer of naval stores, Jesup, Ga., was born in Liberty County, Ga., July 10, 1852.  He is a son of John and Mary A. (nee Miss Ham) Clark, both natives of Georgia.  The father’s occupation is farming.  He was in the Georgia cavalry about six months during the late war.  He is still living an aged respected citizen of Liberty County.  His wife died March 18, 1866, aged thirty-three years.  Both parents are members of the Mission Baptist Church.  They had seven children, namely:  subject, Mary E., now the widow of G.H. Hayman, and now living in Liberty County; Laura A., wife of Thomas J. Shave, living in Liberty County; Noble H., married to Alice A. BAshlor, living in Wayne County; Hollis W., married to Almira Shave, living in Savannah; John J.B., deceased October 6, 1881, aged nineteen and a half years; Louisa D., wife of A.D. Richardson, living in Liberty County.
            Our subject was educated in Liberty County.  His first work for himself was on the Macon and Brunswick Railroad for three years.  He then changed to the S.F. and W. for three years.  He then began the manufacture of naval stores and articles, in which business he is still engaged, and in which he has been quite successful.  He was married January 24, 1869, to Miss Sarah C. Black, daughter of J.J. and J.C. Black, of Jesup, Ga., both of whom are old and respected citizens; they are still living.
            The home of our subject and wife has been blessed in the birth of eight children, namely:  Willie Oscar, John H., Walter J., Cora B., Ralph B., Nelson V., Lillian M., Franklin B., deceased August 27, 1887.  Mr. Clark is a Mason and senior warden in Jesup lodge, No. 112.  He is also a member of the Knights of Honor and Knights of Pythias organizations.  He is a member of the Democratic executive committee of Liberty County; represented the lodge here (K. of P.) before the grand lodge several times and was elected to do so again this year; held office in the grand lodge two terms; is orderly sergeant in Liberty Independent Troops, a military organization of Liberty County, Mr. Clark takes a deep interest in the prosperity of the county, with whose interests he has been associated throughout most of his life, and is regarded as one of the earnest and progressive citizens.  His surroundings indicate a pleasant, happy home.

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COHEN, Adolph M.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 178-179

            ADOLPH M. COHEN was born in the province of Posen, Germany, May 12, 1834.  He is a son of Moses and Grune (Belezer) Cohen, who were also natives of Germany.
            Mr. Cohen came to America in 1850, being then in his sixteenth year.  For a while he stopped at Lafayette, Ind., then at Louisville, Ky., settling in Georgia in 1853.  He located at Waynesboro and sold goods there for twelve years, being at the same time engaged in cotton and rice planting.  In the meantime he and his brother established a store at Savannah and Mr. Cohen afterwards moved there.  During the same time he continued to carry on his plantation.  He moved to Brunswick in 1876 and engaged in the lumber business.  He passed through the yellow fever scourge of that year but lost a sister and brother-in-law.  He returned to Savannah in 1880 and continued to carry on the lumber business, but afterwards returned to Brunswick where he has since remained.
            At the opening of the war Mr. Cohen was for peace and the preservation of the Union, but finding himself in a hopeless minority he was forced in self-defense to move across the lines or enlist, so he enlisted in 1862 in the Fiftieth Georgia volunteers and remained in service some months until he procured a substitute.  The war played havoc with him, as it did with many others, financially.  He lost at one time ninety-six bales of sea island and thirty-five bales of upland cotton.  He has been pressing his claim for indemnity against the government for this property for years, but without success.
            In 1866 Mr. Cohen returned to Germany, but soon came back, bringing with him some of his relatives and others, among them Miss Minna Kwilecki, whom he afterwards married and by whom he has five children, namely:  David, Max Albert, Frederick, Edwin and DaisyMr. Cohen is a member of the Masonic fraternity, the American Legion of Honor, the Jewish orders Kersher and B’nai B’rith, the latter of which he has been president of.  As stated, Mr. Cohen was considerably crippled financially during the war, but his industry and practical sagacity have put him on his feet again and he has in a great measure recovered from his misfortunes.  He comes from a remarkably long-lived stock, and though he is now past his fifty-third year he yet retains the vigor and genial spirits of his youth.

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COLSON, M.J.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 183-184

            M.J. COLSON, hardware clerk, of Brunswick, Ga., was born in Calhoun County, May 27, 1846, and is a son of James and Eva E. (Inabionet) Colson, the former a native of Maryland, born in 1824, and a son of Dennis Colson, who was of English extraction.  James Colson settled in Calhoun County, Ga., while yet a young man, is a planter and still resides in the county named above.  He married Eva E. Inabionet, who was a daughter of Andrew Inabionet, and was born in Barnwell District, S.C., in 1828.  Andrew Inabionet was of Scotch descent, was a rice planter and slave holder in his native State, but settled in Georgia in 1844, and engaged in cotton planting.  He was also a civil engineer.  To his marriage were born six children, the eldest of whom is our subject, and the remainder were born in the following order:  John D., Joseph D., Victoria, Martha and H. Wilson.
            M.J. Colson had received a good preliminary education and was just ready to enter upon a collegiate course, when the war broke out, but he did not enlist, owing to his youthful age, until the fall of 1863, when he joined Company D, Capt. Payne, of Finley’s battalion, and served until the close of the war, surrendering at Greensboro, N.C.  On his return to Calhoun County he remained two years and then went to Albany, Ga., where he was engaged in merchandising until 1871; he then moved to Brunswick, Ga., where he is now conducting a hardware and agricultural implement store for L.D. Hoyt & Co., he being the junior partner.  In 1873 he was elected by the Democratic party an alderman of the city and served six years, and that he gave satisfaction to his constituents is proved by the fact that he was elected mayor and filled that office for the term of 1882-83.  He is a member of the board of commissioners, and for four years has been a member of the board of education.  November 7, 1872, he married Miss Laura R. Frazier, of Union Springs, Ala., daughter of Thomas G. and Martha (Bars) Frazier.  The children born to this marriage are—James T. and Ella J.  The family are members of the Methodist Church.

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CROVATT, A.J.
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 982 & 983

            Hon. A.J. Crovatt, Brunswick, Glynn Co., Georgia, judge of the county court of Glynn County, is a son of William and Theodora (Williams) Crovatt, and was born in Charleston, South Carolina, 23 June 1857.  His father was a son of Gibbs Crovatt, of Charleston, whose wife was Miss Rebecca FrazierJudge Crovatt was educated at the high school, Charleston, at Charleston College, and also at the Carolina Military Institute, from which last-named institution he graduated in 1877.  At college he was a member of the S.A.E. fraternity, and took a very active and prominent part in the exercises of the literary society to which he belonged, and of which for some time he was president.  While at college he began the study of law, which after graduating he continued under A.J. Smith.  After being admitted to the bar he formed a partnership with G.B. Mabry, the then solicitor-general, and who, later, was judge of the Brunswick circuit court.  Dissolving the partnership he practice alone a few years; then in 1883 he entered into partnership with Judge Bolling Whitfield, which is still in existence.  Judge Crovatt was mayor of Brunswick in 1883 and 1884; and the last year, though opposed by the most popular man in the city, was reelected by a handsome majority.  On the expiration of his second term he was importuned to accept the mayoralty again, but preferring the county judgeship, he declined.  As mayor he was progressive and aggressive, ever alive and on the alert to push to consummation every movement and improvement he believed would advance the interests of the city.  His services as mayor were invaluable.  Among the many things accomplished were:  The sinking of two artesian wells, whose value to the city cannot by over-estimated; the reorganization and increased efficiency of the police force; the building of brick guard and engine room; and the improvement of the park.  As mayor Judge Crovatt originated and perfected the gas and water contracts and was largely instrumental in securing the location of the Brunswick & Western Railway shops at Brunswick.  Judge Crovatt as county solicitor, and the firm of Crovatt & Whitfield as city attorneys, have made brilliant records for themselves in their management of cases; and as practitioners in the city, county, state, and United States courts their clientage has been large and is increasing-they having been eminently successful.  Judge Crovatt has been chairman of the county democratic executive committee, and has represented the county in senatorial, congressional, and gubernatorial conventions.  As an attorney Judge Crovatt already ranks very high, and he is rapidly rising in reputation.  As a man of affairs he has few equals--no superiors--and no citizen has a stronger hold on the confidence of the people in regard to general soundness of judgment, unswerving integrity, firmness of purpose and character, and high sense of honor in the matter of personal and public obligations.  He is a born politician.  Added to extreme boldness, undaunted courage, and an almost reckless aggressiveness, are intuition and seemingly unerring judgment, that make him irresistible and invincible as a leader in a political contest.  With such a splendid record as his career so far presents, and with abilities and characteristics such as he is acknowledged to possess, almost any position, private or public, he may desire or aspire to would seem to be assured him.  Judge Crovatt was married in 1880 to Miss Mary Lee, a daughter of Charles L. and Frances Schlatter, a union which has been blessed with three children:  William Cecil, Alfred Hayne, and Mary LeeJudge and Mrs. Crovatt are members of St. Mark's Protestant Episcopal Church, of which he has been a vestryman.  The judge is a Knight of Pythias, a member of the I.O.O.F., and of the Legion of Honor.

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DART, E.M.
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 983 & 984.

            E.M. Dart, merchant, Brunswick, Glynn Co., Georgia, son of Edgar C.P. and Ellen M. (Moore) Dart, natives of Brunswick, was born 8 March 1857.  E.C.P. Dart was a son of Cyrus Dart, one of the early settlers, and was lawyer by profession. He at one time held the office of justice of the peace, and was clerk of superior court for more than ten years, which covered the period of the “war between the states.” His services in this capacity were invaluable, as he kept strict and vigilant guard over the record books and court documents, transporting them from place to place for safe keeping, performed all clerical work required, and at the close of the war delivered the same intact without a cent of charge to the county. Since the war he has filled the office of ordinary and was succeeded by his nephew, Horace Dart, the present incumbent. E.M. Dart started in life a poor man but has managed so well as to have established a fine mercantile business and attained to an influential position in the commercial world, having in the meantime rendered timely and valuable assistance to his father during the panic of 1873. Combining prudence with enterprise, he is sure of splendid success. He is a member of the First Methodist Church at Brunswick, and succeeded his father on the board of trustees.

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DART, Horace
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 984.

            Horace Dart, ordinary of Glynn County, Georgia, son of Urbanus and Eliza R. (Moore) Dart, was born in Brunswick, Georgia, 17 April 1837.  His grandfather, Cyrus Dart, of English descent, a native of Connecticut, came south when a young man, and was connected with the army as a physician during the Creek Indian War.  He was stationed for a while at Colerain on St. Mary’s River.  He lived a short time on St. Simon’s Island, and afterward settled in Brunswick.  He was drowned by the capsizing of a boat, on which occasion his son, Urbanus, then an eight-year-old boy, saved himself by swimming to St. Simons Island beach.  Urbanus Dart, son of the above and father of Horace, was born in a block house at Colerain, on St. Mary’s River, and came with his parents when quite young to Brunswick, which was afterward his home.  He served the county as sheriff, represented it in the general assembly several terms, and was a member of the first constitutional convention held after the war.  Horace Dart began life as a poor man, but subsequently inherited property from his father (Urbanus’) estate, which with his own handsome accumulations insures him a competency at least.  In 1861 he enlisted for a short time in the Brunswick Rifles, of which he had previously been a member for a short time; but later he enlisted for the war.  Being disabled by a wound received at Fredericksburg, he was assigned to hospital duty.  In 1865 he was elected tax receiver and served two years.  He was afterward elected sheriff to serve an unexpired term and also served a term as deputy-sheriff.  After this he was elected ordinary to fill an unexpired term; and at the ensuing regular election he was elected for the full term, not yet expired. In addition to a large landed estate Mr. Dart is largely interested in the following named water craft:  Two stanch tug boats, the “Urbanus Dart” and the “Dauntless”--the last named a very superior boat which cost $30,000, and can easily make from twelve to fifteen miles an hour; and two passenger boats, the “Pope Catlin” and the “Egmont”.  Mr. Dart married on 17 August 1863 to Miss Harriet E.W. Ashcraft, born in Newnan, Georgia, by whom he had seven children, three of whom are living. Mrs. Dart is a member of the Presbyterian Church.

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DART, Jacob E.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida", Chicago, IL: F.A. Battey & Company, 1889; page 213 & 214.

            Hon. J.E. DART, collector of customs, was born in Brunswick, Ga., July 5, 1845, and is a son of Urbanus and Eliza (Moore) DartUrbanus Dart was born in Coldrain [sic], Ga., November 29, 1800.  He was sheriff of Glynn County, also surveyor.  He represented Glynn County in the legislature for thirty years, and was a particular friend of Bob Toombs and Alexander H. Stephens.  He died in 1884 a very popular man.  His father, Cyrus Dart, was a native of England, and was accidentally drowned in St. Simons, Island, Glynn County, Ga., in 1816.  He was a physician by profession, was a surgeon in the Revolutionary war, and also in the war of 1812.  He was intimately acquainted with Gen. George WashingtonMrs. Eliza Dart was born in Glynn County, Ga., a daughter of Jacob Moore, of Irish extraction.  Our subject is the fourth of seven living children, the others being Horace, Frank, Urbanus, William R., John B., and ElizaJacob E. Dart went to school sixteen months only.  May 29, 1861, he enlisted in the Confederate army, in the Brunswick riflemen, Twenty-sixth Georgia regiment, A.R. Lawton's brigade, but was subsequently transferred to Gordon's brigade, Stonewall Jackson's corps, better known as Jackson's foot cavalry.  In the same company were our subject's brothers, Horace, Frank, and Urbanus.  On the 13th of December, 1862, at the first battle of Fredericksburg, Mr. Dart was wounded in the right leg by the fragment of a shell.  After the first and second battles of Fredericksburg, he was discharged by Gen. Lee on account of being under eighteen years of age; he returned to his home and remained until he was eighteen years old and then re-enlisted in the same command.  Besides the battles named, he participated in those of the 5th and 6th of May, 1864, at the Wilderness in Virginia; the 10th, 12th, and 19th of May, 1864, at Spottsylvania, Va.; 1st and 3d of June, 1864, at Cold Harbor, Va., and Lynchburg June 12; also at Maryland Heights, July 6; the battle near Frederick City, July 9; at Winchester, Va., and was taken sick at the battle of Cedar Creek, September 21, 1864.  He was then sent home, but recovered and started back; but when he got to Fort Valley, Ga., he was captured by Wilson's cavalry and informed that Gen. Lee had surrendered.  He was, of course, at once released.  He then connected himself with E.T.V. and Ga. R.R., and was subsequently connected with the Brunswick & Western Railroad till 1875, having served, however, as mayor of Brunswick in 1874.  He then opened a general store at St. Simon's Island, Glynn County, Ga., and in 1880 his entire stock of goods was destroyed by fire; his loss was $8,000 with only $2,000 insurance.  In 1882 he was elected to the legislature from Glynn County, and was re-elected in 1884; the same year he was a delegate to the convention in Chicago, Ill., which nominated Cleveland for President.  While in the legislature he was chairman of the wild land committee; he was also on the committee of railroads, education, and rules of the house.  November 9, 1885, he was appointed collector of customs of the Brunswick district, which office he now has.  August 7, 1867, he married Kate E. Robinson, of Brunswick, Ga., daughter of H.B. and Eliza (Harris) Robinson.  Six children blessed this union, viz.:  Herman, Eugene, Kate, Edgar, Orrilla, and ReginaHerman was an uncommonly industrious boy and had just received an appointment to West Point when he died, October 28, 1885.  Edgar and Kate are also deceased.  Eugene received an appointment to the Annapolis Naval School.  Capt. Dart is a Master Mason and has been senior warden; he is also a member of the I.O.O.F.

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DeLORME, Judge Louis E.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 227 & 228

            JUDGE LOUIS E. DeLORME.  This gentleman is of French extraction, as his name indicates, and traces the origin of his family to the Huguenot immigration of the seventeenth century.  The name was originally Bree, but the grandfather owning among others a large estate called Lorme, got to be known as Bree de Lorme or Bree of Lorme, and the Bree being in time dropped, he was known simply as DeLorme.  He came to this country in 1816 and landed at Charleston, S.C.; with him he brought a son, then about twelve years of age and a daughter younger.  This son grew up to manhood and afterwards married Miss Mary Lasserre.  To them were born three children:  Louis E.B., the subject of this sketch; Urania, who was afterwards married to Capt. Geo. W. Long, and Louisa Josephine, who was married to Edwin Davis, a prominent planter of South Carolina.  Achilles A. DeLorme, father of our subject, located in Darien, Ga., and lived there a great many years, dying at that place in 1873 at the advanced age of sixty-nine.  For more than twenty years he was agent of the steamboat lines plying between that and other points; was postmaster before, after and during the war, was judge of probate for twelve years, a Mason in splendid standing, and a citizen much respected for his strict business habits and moral, upright life.
            Judge Louis E.B. DeLorme was born in Camden County, Ga., July 1, 1830.  His education--what he got--was obtained from the public schools of Camden County.  He went on the wharf at an early age with his father, assisting him in his duties, and there remained for some time. Feeling that there was something better in store for him than the agency of a steamship line, he began on his own motion to read law, and kept this up in connection with his other duties for ten years.  he was admitted to the bar in 1859, and located and began to practice in Darien.  On the opening of the war Judge DeLorme enlisted in a local cavalry company and did some service on the skirmish line; afterwards he returned to Darien, but did not remain inactive long.  Another company of militia was organized; Judge DeLorme was chosen captain, and he continued to do general service around Darien till the war was over, being assigned once to Atlanta, where his duties were of the same general nature.  Judge DeLorme was deputy ordinary of McIntosh County during the war, and was afterwards chosen justice of the inferior court, which position he held four years.  He is now enjoying a good practice in his profession.
            January, 1856, Judge DeLorme married Miss Rosalie V. Fraysee, daughters of John Fraysee, lumberman and planter, of Wallsboro, S.C.  He has had six children born to him:  Louis, now dead; M.C., now also dead: Achilles A., Stephen (dead), Rosalie F. and Edward P.  He also had the misfortune to lose his wife by death in 1880.
            Judge DeLorme is a Mason and has been a member of the Presbyterian Church for twenty-five years.
            (Since the above was prepared for the press, it is learned that the judge departed this life early in the summer of 1888.)

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DOWNING, Columbia (Col.)
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 239-240

            COL. C. DOWNING, JR., president of the First National Bank of Brunswick, Ga., was born in Meigs County, Ohio, February 1, 1845, the son of C. and Jane (Smith) DowningC. Downing, the father of our subject, was born near Augusta, Maine, in 1809, was a planter and coal merchant, and during the recent war was United States assessor.  For sixteen years he was in the internal revenue service, and also represented Meigs County, O., four years in the State legislature, was for twenty-five years county commissioner, and is the present mayor of Middleport, Ohio.  He is a son of Samuel Downing, a native of Maine, of English extraction and a farmer, who moved to Ohio in 1818.  Mrs. Jane Downing was born in Meigs County, Ohio, and is a daughter of John Smith, a native of New Hampshire, who, when a child, went with his parents to Ohio and there became a farmer.  Of the children born to Mr. and Mrs. C. Downing, four are living, viz.:  John F., Lucy Thompson, Colonel C. (the subject of this sketch), and Harvey.  At the age of seventeen years the subject of this sketch had received a very fair education, but, before entering upon a business career, enlisted, young as he was, in the Seventh Ohio battery, field artillery, Federal service.  He was appointed bugler, but subsequently was commissioned second lieutenant, and at the close of the war held the rank of first lieutenant.  He took part in the battle of Hatchie, in the siege of Vicksburg, and other important engagements.  He served the last year of the war as aide-de-camp to Gen. J.A. Maltby.  On his return home he entered the Ohio University at Athens, where he studied three years.  After graduating he commenced his business life as a clerk at Pomeroy, Ohio, but afterwards was connected with the Ohio River Salt Company, with which he remained seven years, three years of this time being passed as treasurer for the company.  In 1877, he moved to Atlanta, Ga., and opened an agency for the Standard Oil Company, but afterwards went to Savannah, Ga., where he was agent for the same company until 1881, when he moved to Brunswick and opened a naval storehouse for his company, but a year later bought this business for his own use.  He annually handles about 125,000 barrels of rosin and 25,000 barrels of turpentine, the value of which reaches $600,000.  In addition to his naval stores business he transacts a wholesale grocery and provision trade, his sales in this department reaching a quarter of a million dollars per year.  When the First National Bank of Brunswick was organized in February, 1884, with a capital stock of $55,000, Col. Downing was made its president, W.E. Burbage vice-president, and James Herr Smith, cashier.  The bank has now a surplus of $33,000, and its stock sells at 160.  October 14, 1875, Col. Downing married Miss Mary Remington, daughter of Wm. H. Remington, of Pomeroy, Ohio.  Of the children born to this marriage, two are living—Mary Ethel and Madeline.  The Colonel is a director in the Oglethorpe Hotel Company, is a Master Mason, and, with his wife, is a member of the Episcopal Church.

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duBIGNON, J.E.
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 984 & 985.

            J.E. Du Bignon, capitalist and banker, Brunswick, Glynn Co., Georgia, is a son of Joseph and Felicite (Riffault) du Bignon, natives respectively of Jekyl Island and Bordeaux, France, and was born in Brunswick on 2 January 1849. The family is one of the oldest and one among the wealthiest in southeastern Georgia.  Mr. DuBignon’s great-grandfather, of the royal navy of France, became the owner of Jekyl Island in 1791. His grandson, Joseph, Mr. DuBignon’s father, was an extensive cotton planter and a man of wealth and influence. This island of Jekyl, so called by Gen. Oglethorpe, after his friend Sir Joseph Jekyl, an eminent English statesman, is a beautiful spot about eleven miles long, and contains about twenty-two square miles. In 1885 Mr. DuBignon had acquired the interest of the family and had become the sole owner of the island, where he organized the famous “Jekyl Island Club,” which includes in its membership many of the wealthiest and most prominent business and professional men and capitalist in the north and west, and is the largest out-of-home club in the world.  Mr. DuBignon was elected alderman of the city of Brunswick in 1876 and re-elected continually until 1880, was on the finance committee and took an active part in the adjustment of the bond question and in everything relating to the city’s interests. In December, 1893, he was again elected a member of the board of aldermen and was placed on the finance and other committees. The estimation in which Mr. DuBignon is held financially and socially is best evidenced by the many prominent and honorable as well as responsible positions he has been called upon to fill. He is president of the Cumberland Route, Brunswick & South Atlantic Company; president of the Brunswick Club; vice-president of the Brunswick Title Guarantee and Loan Company; a director and member of the finance committee of the Brunswick Saving and Trust Company; in the Brunswick Foundry and Manufacturing Company; and in the St. Simons Transit Company; and is principal owner of the magnificent Oglethorpe Hotel property. He also owns a fifth interest in the Brunswick Street Railroad, and is principal owner of the Brunswick & Altamaha Canal property. He was a member of the committee having in charge the extensive sewerage system adopted by the city, and as such took a lively interest in the work, and a prominent and very active part in furthering it, and was largely instrumental in the successful accomplishment of this great, important movement. He is largely interested in many enterprises, public and private, which shows his absolute faith in the future of Brunswick, as well as the confidence of the people in his ability as a general business man and financier. Mr. DuBignon was married in 1876 to Frances, eldest daughter of Col. Charles L. Schlatter, an accomplished and eminent civil engineer, who in early life was chief engineer of the state of Pennsylvania and of the Ogdensburg Railroad of New York, etc.  Col. Schlatter came to Georgia on account of failing health, requiring a mild climate, and became deeply interested in Brunswick; and to him belongs the credit of originating and organizing the Brunswick & Albany (now Brunswick & Western) Railroad.  Mr. and Mrs. DuBignon have one daughter. They are members of the Protestant Episcopal Church.

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DUNHAM, Jacob Hendricks
“Georgia Baptists:  Historical & Biographical” J.H. Campbell, 1874; pgs. 204-206

            Is mentioned in the preceding sketch as having been the first white person ever baptized in Liberty county.  His grandfather, Mr. William Dunham, came to that county among the first settlers, and located on Newport river, where he died in 1756, leaving behind several daughters and three sons, James, Charles and John.
            Mr. John Dunham removed to McIntosh county, where his son Jacob, the subject of this notice was born, February 26, 1774.  Little is known of his youth, only that his opportunities for education were very limited, his father being very poor and the country newly settled.  He is known to have exhibited a manly disposition and daring spirit quite uncommon for one of his years.  He was foremost in everything that required either activity, strength, or the most undaunted courage.  His marriage with Miss Mary Baisden took place September 12th, 1799.  Having settled in Liberty county, he mae a public profession of religion the 20th of September, 1806.  Two years thereafter he entered upon the work of the ministry, which he prosecuted with energy and zeal for twenty-four years, until his Master called him to enjoy the reward of his labors.
            His field of labor was among a class of people who were unable to pay for his services as he deserved and needed.  Consequently the whole amount he received during his whole course must have been very small.  Yet this in nowise abated his zeal; for while he toiled most laboriously to sustain a large family, he did not spare himself from heat nor cold, from hardships nor privations, that he might carry the glad tidings into the highways and hedges of the surrounding country.  The backwoods of Liberty, the settlements of poor people along the Altamaha river, the blacks about Darien and on the sea islands, (St. Catherine’s, Sapelo, etc.;) these were the fields of his labors—these the people who joyfully received the Word from his lips.  Year after year, until late in life, would he hold his plough handles up to the very hour when he should set out upon his mission, and then, throwing his saddle upon his plough horse, he would press forward, with a heart burning with love to God and man; or, launch his canoe, and help to work his own passage from ten to fifteen miles, to carry the lamp of life to the hundreds of poor blacks whose lots were cast on the islands adjacent.  The writer has never known a more devoted, self-sacrificing minister, nor, according to his talents, a more useful one.  Hundreds, perhaps thousands, were converted under his ministry and baptized by his hands.  No missionary in Burmah [sic], in China, or Africa, was ever more willing to sacrifice all for Christ and his cause.
            It is matter of sincere regret that so little can now be collected of the labors and usefulness of such a man.  But his record is on high.  His death occurred the 25th of September, 1832.  A large family were left behind, nearly all of whom have become “heirs of the grace of life.”  One lovely daughter, Louisa, was snatched away in the morning of life to join her sainted father in heaven.  Though her demise was sudden, (oh, how sudden!) yet she was prepared for it, as is confidently believed by her friends.  Only three of his children are now living.

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DUNN, David T.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" page 252

            HON. DAVID T. DUNN, mayor of Brunswick, Ga., was born in Elmira, N.Y., February 5, 1833, and is a son of James and Eliza (Thompson) Dunn, the former a native of and an attorney of Bath, N.Y., of Irish extraction, and a judge of the circuit court for several years; the latter was a native of Goshen, Orange County, N.Y., and was a daughter of David Thompson.  Of the four children still living, born to these parents, Hon. David T. Dunn is the eldest, the others being Henry T., Helen N. and Isaac B.  David T. Dunn began his business life at the age of twelve in a book store.  In 1869 he came south and located in Brunswick, Ga., and for a number of years was engaged in private banking, but during President Hayes’ administration was appointed deputy revenue collector and filled that position four years.  For three years he was United States commissioner and postmaster of Brunswick.  He served as a member of the board of aldermen in 1880-81, was elected mayor of Brunswick in 1887, and re-elected in 1888.  He took an active part in organizing the Board of Trade in Brunswick, and for the past six years has been president of the Glynn County Agricultural Society; he is also a member of the school board, was instrumental in organizing the fire department and has been connected with the latter for more than fifteen years.  In addition to all his other meritorious acts he contributed largely to the building of the Presbyterian Church of Brunswick, one of the finest in the city, and to assist the city in its accommodations for visitors, became a stockholder in the Oglethorpe Hotel.  A record such as here given of Mr. Dunn needs no comment.  It tells its own story.  In 1885 Mr. Dunn married Mary E. Tuthill, a daughter of Charles G. Tuthill of Starkey, Yates County, N.Y., and by her had one child, Frederick, now deceased.

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DUNN, Henry T.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" page 251

            HENRY T. DUNN, of Brunswick, was born in Elmira, N.Y., in 1843.  He is a son of James and Eliza Dunn.  His father is of Irish extraction and was born in Bath, N.Y.  He was a lawyer by profession, and for a number of years was judge of one of the circuits in New York.  Mrs. James Dunn, whose maiden name was Eliza Thompson, was a daughter of David Thomson and was born in Goshen, Connecticut.  Henry T. Dunn is the third of four surviving children, the others being—David T., Helen M. and Isaac B.  He received his primary education in Elmira.  At the opening of the war he enlisted in the Twenty-third New York regiment, but was soon transferred to the Naval Academy, which was then at Newport, to be educated for a naval officer.  He remained at the academy till 1864, at which time he returned to Elmira and went into business.  He had the misfortune to be burned out there in 1867, and then went to Baltimore, where he remained till 1870.  During this year he located in Brunswick and was for fifteen years deputy collector of customs at the port of this place.  He was also engaged in mercantile business during this time.  He was commissioned consul of Uruguay in 1881, and still holds that position.  He has been alderman two terms in the city of Brunswick, and is also a member of the Board of Trade.  He is one of the largest merchants in Brunswick.  He was married December 22, 1864, to Miss Margaret Baker, in Elmira, N.Y., and there has been born to them one child, Frank A.  Mr. Dunn is a clear, level-headed business man, and matter of fact in all his transactions.

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GRUBB, Richard W.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" page 345 & 346

            RICHARD W. GRUBB was born in Quincy, Gasden County, Fla., October 30, 1852.  He is a son of Nicholas and Elizabeth Grubb, being the youngest of nine children.  He is preeminently a self-made man.  Losing his mother at the age of twelve he was early thrown on the world, where most of his education has been obtained.  He apprenticed himself, of his own accord, at the age of thirteen, to the printer's trade in the office of the Quincy Commonwealth, where he remained four years, when the office was destroyed by fire.  For a few months following he was employed on the Quincy Journal, going in June, 1868, to Brunswick, Ga., where he entered the office of the Seaport Appeal.  He remained there until March, 1874, when, on the advice of his employer, T.F. Smith, who had become his warm personal friend, Mr. Grubb went to Darien, Ga., to begin the publication of a paper for himself.  April 24, 1874, his name first appeared as a journalist.  the name of his paper was the Darien Timber GazetteMr. Grubb was a comparative stranger in Darien as well as being new in the field of journalism, but he had industry, enterprise and good general ability, and he knew that these would win.  He built up a good home paper, one that was widely read and universally appreciated; and what was perhaps of vastly more interest to Mr. Grubb he had the financial strings of his new enterprise in such a shape that he made his paper pay for the office and entire outfit within one year from the time when he started.  But while fortune favored him, as she always does the industrious, his was not destined to be the "primrose way."  Just as he was beginning to reap the reward of his labors his office was destroyed by fire and every dollar that he possessed was swept away.  He was not discouraged, however.  He immediately went to work and by the aid of a few friends he resumed the publication of his paper in a short time, and the Gazette grew and prospered as never before.  But in April, 1879, the fire-fiend paid the office another visit, destroying everything as before, but fortunately this time the proprietor was carrying some insurance and the loss was not total.  Phoenix-like the Gazette rose again after the lapse of ten months an started for the third time on its career of influence and usefulness.  It has grown steadily since and is now recognized as one of the livest, newsiest and best edited county papers in the State.  The people of Darien and McIntosh County have shown their appreciation of Mr. Grubb in other ways beside the liberal patronage they have extended to him and his newspaper enterprises.  In August, 1876, he was sent as delegate to the Democratic State gubernatorial convention, where he assisted in the nomination of Gov. Colquitt.  In September of the same year he was elected as a delegate to the congressional convention of the first district, which nominated the Hon. Julian Hartridge, and was elected secretary of that body.  He was a delegate and secretary of the congressional convention of 1878; and in June, 1880, was a delegate to the State Democratic convention which selected delegates for the national convention held at Cincinnati.  He was also a delegate to the Chicago convention in 1884, and voted for Cleveland from the beginning.  It is a noteworthy fact that Mr. Grubb advocated the nomination of Cleveland as the Democratic candidate for President three days after he was elected governor of New York.  He was a member of the Democratic State executive committee for several years, and his opinion is of weight on political matters among his brethren of the press.  On February 3, 1876, Mr. Grubb married Miss Alice H. Marlin, of Brunswick, to which connection he is indebted for much of the pleasure and success which he has enjoyed.  Mr. Grubb is a deputy collector of customs at the port of Darien.  He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and an industrious, enterprising citizen and a clever gentleman.

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HARRIS, Dr. Raymond B.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 381-382

            DR. RAYMOND B. HARRIS was born May 15, 1838, at Palermo, Bryant county, Ga., was educated in Liberty County, Ga., commenced the study of medicine in 1856 and graduated from the Savannah Medical College, in March, 1859; he was elected demonstrator of anatomy in the above college immediately after graduation, and served in that capacity until the Confederate war broke out, when he was appointed an assistant surgeon, in which capacity he served to the end of the war, first in the hospitals of Richmond, Va., and then in the Tennessee army; he was attached to the Fifty-seventh Georgia regiment, Smith’s brigade, Claibourne’s division, served to the end of the war, and surrendered at High Point, N.C., in April, 1865.  His grandfather came from Virginia and settled in Columbia County, Ga., where Dr. Raymond Harris, father of Raymond, B., was born in the year 1798.  He was educated at Eatonton, Ga., and was a graduate of the University of Athens.  He studied medicine and graduated at the Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, Pa., about 1823-4.  He practiced his profession for sixty-four years and did not retire until compelled to do so from extreme old age.  He served as State senator with Robt. Toombs, M.D. Crawford and Howell Cobb.  He also served in the war of 1812, and although a mere boy did excellent and effective service.  He planted sea-island cotton upon a large scale and accumulated considerable wealth, which consisted principally of lands and negroes, and when the war ended, like all southern planters lost largely, but being a man of iron will and of great energy, he accepted the situation with what capital he had left, commenced lending money at a high rate of interest (for just after the war money was scarce in Georgia) and in this way, together with his profession, he again accumulated quite a fortune.  He died at the advanced age of ninety years, and is buried in the village of Welthomville, Liberty County.  Dr. Raymond B. Harris, during the year 1876, served as mayor of the town of Jesup, and as chairman of the board of health of the city of Darien from 1878 to 1881.  In November, 1880, he was elected to the State senate from the second senatorial district of Georgia, and his course in that body evinced a capacity for great usefulness.  As chairman on the special committee of hygiene he drafted and introduced a number of bills designed to promote medical science and public health of the State, and among them was a bill to provide a State board of pharmaceutic [sic] examiners, which is now in beneficial operation.  In April, 1866, the doctor married Miss Laura E. Desher, who bore him three children, viz.:  Mary Ella, Cothern Walton and CorneliaMrs. Laura Ella Harris died in 1875, and in 1876 the doctor married Miss Ophelia L. Desher, a sister of his first wife, who bore him Raymond Victor and Mary Winn.  The boy Raymond Victor was born on the day of our subject’s election to the State senate, and, as it was a very close race, the doctor, having been elected by only two majority, the babe was named VictorCornelia died at the age of eleven, of diphtheria.  The mother of R.B. Harris before marriage was Miss Mary Law, a daughter of Nathaniel Law, also a sister of Judge William Law (deceased) of the supreme court.  She was born in 1808 and died in 1871, a member of the Presbyterian Church.  As a practitioner Dr. Harris has been phenomenally successful; he is universally popular, and wins all hearts by the kindness and generosity of his own, and his manly character, coupled with a natural politeness which is exhibited to all, rich and poor, learned and unlearned.

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HARVEY, John P.
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 985.

            John P. Harvey, deceased, son of John P. and Charlotte (Gardner) Harvey, both of English descent, and natives of Baker Co., Georgia, was born in Lumpkin, Stewart Co., Georgia, 25 December 1844. His father went to Macon soon after his birth, where he was engaged in mercantile business until he died. His mother died in 1874, aged sixty-one years.  Mr. Harvey was educated in the city schools, Macon, Georgia, and later in life learned the trade of cabinet maker. In 1861 he enlisted in Jackson Artillery of Macon, with which he remained six months, and was mustered out. He immediately re-enlisted in Capt. T.J. Holt’s cavalry company, and a year later was transferred to Anderson’s artillery company of Pulaski County, which he remained with until near the close of the war; owing to poor health he was sent to the hospital at Macon. After the war he worked awhile at his trade, and then went into a railroad shop as foreman, holding the position eighteen years. Resigning, he became a contractor and builder in Brunswick, but about 1889 re-entered the railway service in the same capacity as before. In 1891 he was elected to the office of sanitary superintendent of Brunswick, and held it until his death. A notable tribute to his worth and general efficiency as a public officer is the fact of his holding the office of alderman of the city for twelve successive years, his service ending in 1888. Mr. Harvey was married to Miss Jane Kendrick, 16 September 1863, who has borne him nine children, six of whom are living:  Henry H., Nina (Mrs. Bryant), Estelle, Annetta, Annabelle, and Ada.  Mr. Harvey was a Knight of Pythias and master of exchequer of his lodge until he declined re-election.  Mr. Harvey died 12 November 1894, lamented by a large circle of friends.  Mrs. Harvey and her daughters are members of the Methodist Church.

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HENMAN, John L.N.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" page 394

            JOHN L.N. HENMAN, cashier of the Oglethorpe National Bank, Brunswick, Ga., was born in Berlin, Worcester County, Md., February 1, 1867, and is the eldest of the four children yet living, the others being Mary, E.S., Florida B. and William B., born to John N. and Martha I. (Burbage) Henman, both born in Berlin, Md.  John N. Henman, father of our subject, is the present cashier of the United States sub-treasury at Baltimore.  John L.N. Henman was educated at Western Maryland College, Md., and for two years was a cadet at West Point.  In 1885 he settled in Brunswick, Ga., and for a few months was messenger in the First National Bank, and in June of the same year was made teller, which position he held until August 1, 1887, at which time he was elected cashier of the Oglethorpe National Bank.  This bank was organized July 6, 1887, with a capital of $100,000; M. Ullman, president; W.E. Burbage, vice-president, and John L.N. Henman, cashier.  The bank has now a surplus of $5,000, and its stock is quoted at 110.  Mr. Henman is said to be the youngest National Bank cashier in the United States, and is a young man of first-rate business qualifications.

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HOPPS, Richard B.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" page 421

            RICHARD B. HOPPS, Jesup, Ga., was born in Wayne County, Ga., December 6, 1841.  His parents are Daniel G. and Frances (Bennett) Hopps, old and highly respected pioneer settlers of Wayne County.
            August, 1861, our subject, as second lieutenant of company A fourth regiment of Georgia cavalry, joined Wheeler’s division along the coast from St. Mary’s up to Darien.  He was also in the Atlanta campaign, Gen. Hood commanding.  Johnson had been in command, but was displaced by Hood at about the time he left the coast.  The subject’s command was in the rear flank, and ahead of Sherman in his raid.  He was on the coast off Brunswick when the war closed.  He was in during the entire war, but was neither wounded nor taken prisoner.  After the war he went to farming and continued that until 1883.  Since that time he has been railroading on the E.T., Va. & Ga. Railroad.  He has held the position of ordinary of the court for years, being re-elected every four years, last year he was recommended as the representative to the legislature, but would not accept, and is now reporting clerk in the railroad office at Jesup.  He was married June 5, 1864, to Miss Martha J., daughter of Major J.M. and Mary (O’Neal) Bryan, residents of Glenn [sic] County, Ga.  The major died in Florida in 1882 and his wife many years before.  Five children have made happy the home of our subject, viz.:  Mary F., wife of H.J. Benton of the firm of C.C. Grace & Co., Dade City, Fla.; Julia A., Anna C., Georgia B. and Richard B., Jr.  The entire family are members of the Methodist Church.  Mr. Hopps is a member of the Masonic order, a high-toned gentleman, occupies a high position socially, and is recognized as a person of irreproachable business integrity by all who know him.

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LAMB, John P.
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 986.

            John P. Lamb, deceased, treasurer of Glynn County, Georgia, son of John and Elizabeth (Webster) Lamb, natives respectively of South Carolina and Connecticut, was born in Glynn County, near where he now lives, 29 July 1825.  Mr. Lamb’s father was brought to Georgia from South Carolina when a child, and died in Glynn County when about sixty years old, and his mother died when about fifty-five years old. His grandfather, Frederick Lamb, was born in Virginia, and when a boy ran away from home and entered the Revolutionary Army. The disbandment of the army at the close of the war left him at Camden, South Carolina, where he met and married Celia Bowen, and not long afterward came to Georgia and settled in Glynn County. John P. Lamb was elected tax collector of the county in 1852 and again in 1856. In 1860 he was elected sheriff, which office he held at the outbreak of war. On 17 August 1861, he enlisted in the Glynn County Guards. His command was stationed on St. Simons Island, where batteries were established, and where the guards remained until 1862. He served in the army during the entire war but with the forces assigned to coast defense. He surrendered to Capt. Lee of the “Wamsutta”, and was paroled 1 June 1865. In 1872 he was elected treasurer of Glynn County, and was re-elected at each succeeding election, and held it until he died, affording the most conclusive testimony as to his faithfulness and efficiency as an officer, and of his popularity as a citizen.  Mr. Lamb was married in 1844 to Miss Martha Middleton, who after bearing him seven children, all of whom are dead, died 28 November 1878. He was again married in July, 1883, to Miss Amy Jones.  Mr. Lamb began life as a poor man, but died possessed of a good 1,000 acre farm and half a thousand head of cattle, besides much other stock and property. He was regarded as one of Glynn County’s most substantial and highly respected citizens, was a master Mason, and was a member of the Methodist Church, of which his widow is a much-prized and exemplary member.

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LAMB, Thomas W.
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 985 & 986.

            Thomas W. Lamb, collector of customs, Brunswick, Georgia, of Scotch-Irish descent on the father's side, and son of Burrill and Matilda (Bunkley) Lamb, was born on Cumberland Island, Camden Co., Georgia, 7 September 1847. Both parents were natives of Glynn County and belonged to a family among the oldest in the state. His father died in 1881 aged sixty-eight years. His mother, a daughter of Thomas P. Bunkley, died in Brunswick, 11 January 1895, aged seventy-six years. Mr. Lamb was educated at Glynn County Academy, and this limited education constituted his capital, as he began life a poor man. What he has, both of property and official reputation, has been acquired since the war, by honest toil, industry and business ability. In the spring of 1862, a mere youth, he enlisted in Capt. McMiller's company, Fourth Georgia Cavalry, was promoted to second sergeant, served through the entire war, and surrendered with his command at its close. Since the war he has been called to fill many and varied offices, state and Federal, than which no better evidence could be given of his integrity, faithfulness, and efficiency. He has served Glynn County as sheriff six years, represented the county two terms in the house, and the senatorial district one term in the general assembly of the estate, was mayor of Brunswick in 1892 and 1893, the last year during the yellow fever epidemic when he bravely remained at his post of duty, and in January 1894, was appointed collector of customs for the port of Brunswick, Georgia, by President Cleveland. Mayor Lamb passed through two yellow fever epidemics, one in 1876, when he had the fever himself, and the other in 1893, exhibiting a moral courage and self-sacrificing spirit rarely equaled. Mr. Lamb has a fine plantation, 1,000 acres, and a number of fine city lots. He was married in 1866 to Miss Laura B. Kendrick, by whom he had eight children, all of whom are living. Mrs. Lamb died in 1889, and Mr. Lamb married again, 7 February 1893 to Miss Sarah C. Pyles. Mrs. Lamb is a member of the Methodist Church.

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LAW, Josiah Spry
“Georgia Baptists:  Historical & Biographical” J.H. Campbell, 1874; pgs. 322-326

            Josiah Spry Law, son of Rev. Samuel Spry Law and Rebecca G., (Hughes,) his wife, was born in Sunbury, Georgia, on the 5th of February, 1808, and there received a good classical education, principally under the instruction of the Rev. James Shannon.  In 1827, that gentleman having removed to Augusta, at the solicitation of the Baptist church in that city, and desiring an assistant in his school, offered the place to Mr. Law, who accepted it, and at the same time prosecuted his own studies.  Here, during a revival of religion, he was converted and united himself with the Baptist church.
            Up to this time, he had designed entering the profession of the law, to which his mind was peculiarly adapted, and in which he would, no doubt, have been distinguished.  But God had other purposes for him, and his grace touched a chord in the bosom of his young servant that had never vibrated before.  It was not long that he hesitated in regard to his duty.  Surrendering all his previous ambitious aims, he resolved to give himself, without reserve, to whatever work the Master had called him.  That work, he was persuaded, was the gospel ministry.  Accordingly, with a view to prepare himself for it, he soon after entered the Theological Seminary, at Newton, Massachusetts, where he took the usual course of three years, and graduated with credit.  On his return home, he was called to the care of the Sunbury church, and was ordained in December, 1830.  (Rev. Charles B. Jones and J.H. Campbell were ordained at the same time, and by the same ceremony.)
            In January, 1831, he entered upon his ministerial duties, which were discharged with so much zeal and ability that he at once won the confidence and affection of his brethren.  In October, 1832, he accepted an invitation to take charge of the Baptist church at Macon; but, after remaining there a few months, he returned, in the spring of 1833, and resumed his connection with the Sunbury church.  In 1835 he was called to the pastorate of the Baptist church in Savannah, and after spending a year with them, was again called back to his first charge, the Sunbury church; and, in consequence of the declining health of his father, he felt it his duty to return.  In 1840 he became the pastor of the North Newport church, in Liberty county.  He was, also, for several years, pastor of the South Newport church, in McIntosh county.
            The Baptists in Liberty county have at not time been very strong, except with the colored population, among whom they are the prevailing denomination.  Of late years the number of white communicants has been greatly diminished by removal and death.  Sunbury, where their chief strength lay, has been almost entirely forsaken.  The dead who sleep in its quiet grave-yard, and whose faces are not forgotten by the present generation, outnumber far its living inhabitants.  The old church is still there,* like a lonely sentinel amidst surrounding desolation.  Faithful to its office, its old bell yet breaks the silence of the Sabbath morning to herald the coming of the missionary to the negroes, who, for convenience, meet there from different points in the neighborhood, and for whose sake a church organization is still preserved.  North Newport has also suffered severely, but not to the same extent, from the same causes.  Winn, and the elder Screven, and Dunham, and the elder Law, whose names are fragrant in the memory of Baptists, have years ago entered upon their rest.  Those who succeeded them in the ministry have been called to other fields of labor in our own and in heathen lands.  The excellent brother whose career I have undertaken to trace, remained and toiled through all discouragements in a position that promised but little reward beyond the consciousness of a faithful discharge of duty.  (*It was burned to the ground by Federal soldiers during the late war.)
            Deeply concerned for the spiritual welfare of the negroes from the commencement of his ministry, he had been accustomed to devote part of his time to their special benefit, and for several years previous to his death, the largest part of his services was given to them.  He was successful in his labors among them, an evidence of which is found in the fact, that a short time previous to his fatal sickness, he baptized thrity-six [sic], and had, at the time of his death, about sixty candidates for baptism.  This was no unusual occurrence.  Nor was it the result of excitement.  They were well instructed and intelligent converts.  It was his custom (as it is that of the Presbyterian brethren engaged in the same work in Liberty county) not only to preach to them, but also to teach them orally, old and young, upon every occasion, either before or after the sermon.  He felt that the soul of the black man was as precious to the Saviour as that of the master, and every heart that loves Christ and the souls of men, can appreciate the interest for this class and sympathize in the reluctance with which he would contemplate a removal from his charge, that would perhaps leave them without a shepherd and guide.  His ambition was not for worldly distinction, but to do his Master’s will, and to do it well.  Had he sought distinction, it would not have been in vain.  The positions he could have commanded would have opened to him a field in which he could have gratified such a desire, had he cherished it.  A few years before his death, he was elected professor in the theological department of Mercer University, but preferring the more immediate duties of the ministry, he declined.
            He continued in the field of his early labors until attacked by a malignant disease, to which he was much exposed in attendance upon sick and dying friends, and which terminated his life while he was yet in the vigor of manhood, on the 5th of October, 1853.  From the commencement of his illness his sufferings were great—so great that he was unable to converse; and, though sometimes bewildered, he was frequently heard to say, “Thy, will, O Lord, not mine, be done!” and to repeat some passage of scripture suited to himself and his sorrowing family.  His last words were two verses of that beautiful hymn commencing—“There is a land of pure delight.”
            It is no unmerited eulogy to say, that the subject of this notice, in intellectual endowments, in devotion to his high calling, in earnest eloquence, and in fidelity to his office, occupied a very high rank in his profession.  Endowed with the talents that might have qualified him for any station, he new no ambition but to serve God acceptably; he coveted no honor but that of being “found in Christ.”  The buoyancy of his spirits and the warmth of his heart, his frankness and the high tone of feeling which gave a beautiful finish to his character, rendered him a fascinating companion and a valued friend, while his integrity and manly independence secured the respect of all.  His wit and genial humor in social intercourse made him highly attractive to all classes, and especially to the young, over whom his influence was happily exerted.  Social in his feelings, he did not seclude himself in cold isolation from the world around him, but having a heart that could participate in the happiness and sympathize in the sorrows of others, he gave freedom to the noblest emotions of the soul, and endeared himself to his friends by identifying himself with them in every scene of life.  His attachments were strong, and he made no professions of regard but such as were the spontaneous breathings of a warm and generous heart.  No man had warmer friends, and no one was worthier of them.
            As a preacher, he was nice in his discriminations, unfolding the doctrines of the gospel with clearness, and applying them with great power to the practical duties of life.  Independent in thought, and bold in declaring what he believed to be the truth, his sermons were rich in matter, logical, and habitually instructive.  His preparations for the pulpit were thorough, and when he entered the sanctuary, it was with beaten oil.  Ardent in feeling, his eloquence was often highly impassioned, and his whole manner was well fitted to give effect to his discourses.  His last sermon, which was preached the day on which he was attacked by the malady that terminated his life, is said to have been characterized by remarkable unction and impressiveness.  “Christ crucified” was always the burden of the preaching, as it was the ground of his hope.
            Mr. Law was rather below the medium height, well formed, and of agreeable personal appearance.  A free, open countenance, sparkling brown eyes, and a head of fine intellectual development, were expressive of frankness, vivacity and intelligence.  His physical, intellectual and moral man were in admirable harmony.
            Mr. Law married on the 13th of January, 1831, to Ellen S. Barrett, of Augusta, Georgia.  This estimable lady, with ten children—nine sons and a daughter—survived him.  His oldest son had just entered the profession of medicine, and the next that of law, at the time of his death.  He was very happy in his domestic relations, and proved to the wife of his youth a devoted husband.  Practically a stranger to austerity, his children were encouraged to be open and frank in his presence.  At the same time he held them under all needful restraint, thus blending, in his intercourse with them, the freedom of companionship with the authority of “one that ruleth well his own house.”
            His servants were brought under the same rule of kindness and decision by which he controlled his children.  His interest in this class of our Southern population I have already referred to, but it may not be out of place here to remark that he was, in turn, greatly loved by them, and little is hazarded in saying that, in all our broad domain, no servant of Jesus is more sacredly enshrined in the hearts of the grateful children of Africa, who received the gospel from his lips, and to whose spiritual good his life was consecrated.

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LAW, Samuel Spry
“Georgia Baptists:  Historical & Biographical” J.H. Campbell, 1874; pgs. 255-270

            The Rev. Samuel Spry Law, the son of Joseph and Elizabeth Law, was born in Liberty county, Georgia, in the year 1774.  His father removed from Charleston, South Carolina, some years before the birth of his son, Samuel, and settled on the seaboard of Liberty county, and engaged in planting.  He was a man of piety—a member of the Episcopal church—of strict integrity and great firmness.  His mother, whose maiden name was Spry, was a woman of uncommon fortitude, as we may learn from a little incident in her life, which occurred during the darkest period of the revolutionary war.  On one occasion, while her husband was absent from home, their house was plundered by the tories.  She was alone with her children.  Upon leaving, they attempted to set fire to the house, but to this she would not submit.  As soon as they had kindled a fire, she extinguished it, for which she was knocked down.  They attempted to fire the building the second time, and the second time she put the fire out and was knocked down.  This was repeated the third time, when some of the party, with a little more feeling than the rest, persuaded their companions to desist and not burn the house.  Their son, Samuel, inherited the firmness of his parents, for he was a man of undaunted courage and great firmness of purpose.  He grew up during the days of “saddle-bag teachers” and “old-field schools”—names very expressive of the intellectual furniture of the schoolmaster, and literary fertility of the institutions—and he consequently received only the barest rudiments of an English education, such as spelling, reading, writing and simple arithmetic.  The best advantages he enjoyed during his youth, were from a two years’ residence in the family of a French Marquis, on Sapelo island.  In that family he learned to speak the French language with tolerable fluency, and he there acquired that ease and suavity of manners which continued with him through life.
            After he become of age and settled in life, his position in society gave him the advantages of association with intelligent and educated men, which his naturally strong mind and sound judgment turned to good account.  His occupation was that of a planter.  Up to the age of forty, he was strictly a man of the world.  He was a man of high toned feeling, proud, fond of gay life, generous and hospitable almost to a fault.  He was passionately fond of military life, and indulged his taste as far as circumstances would allow.  At the age of twenty-five, he married Miss Mary Anderson, of Liberty county, who lived but eleven months after the marriage.  She left one son, who survived his mother but eighteen months.  In 1802, he was married to Miss Rebecca G. Hughes, of Charleston, by whom he had ten children, some of whom are still living.  Soon after his second marriage, he made Sunbury the place of his summer residence.  In this place there was a Congregational church, and about this time a Baptist church began to rise up under the labors of Rev. C.O. ScrevenMr. Law and his family became members of the congregation of the Congregational church, and some time after his connection with that congregations, he was elected clerk of the selectmen, as we learn from a letter dated 1811, written by the Baptist church to the Congregational church, and addressed to Captain S.S. Law, as clerk of the selectmen of the Congregational church.  In the opposition (and there was much,) that was made to the establishment of a Baptist church in Sunbury, he took a very active part.  Some one or two years after this, his wife having experienced a change of heart, expressed a desire to unite herself to the Baptist church.  This was very much against his wishes, and contrary to his expectations, still he did not oppose her, but simply said to her, “You can do as you please; but remember, when I become a christian, I shall go the other way.”  It was about this time that, rejecting the doctrine of regeneration, he commenced becoming moralist, upon which he rested his hope of acceptance with God.  In accordance with his plan, he became a strict moralist, holding worship morning and evening in his family, which he continued for a while, but at length, “finding it useless,” as he said, he gave it up.  This attempt at self-justification by good works, doubtless arose from a heart ill at ease respecting his future state.
            Among his papers was found a brief account of his feelings, the fall of 1814, before his conversion; it was written after his conversion.  Here follows as much of it as is deemed necessary:  “The day I was forty years of age, I thought much of another world, and prayed most fervently to God that If there really was another state of existence, and a change of heart was necessary, that I might be convinced of it before the year was out or rather before I was forty-one years of age.  My mind was more serious than usual all the fall; frequently found myself absorbed in thought, and at times so absent that I was hardly able to attend to business.  In the month of December following, a Mr. Flint, a young clergyman from New England, came to my house.  I was pleased with his appearance and manners; he was to preach in the meeting-house in the evening.  I at first thought I would go and hear him preach; again I concluded I would not go; that I seldom heard any preaching which was of benefit to me.  The thought then occurred to me that on my birth-day I had prayed to be made sensible of the reality of religion, and if there was any truth in it, to be convinced of it in the course of the year.  This question was then suggested to my mind:  What are considered the effectual means of salvation?  God maketh the reading, but more especially the preaching of his word, and effectual means of salvation.  While reflecting upon this answer, the expression, ‘especially the preaching of his word,’ struck me so forcibly that my mind was made up in an instant to go and hear the preaching in the evening, which I did.  While standing up during the first prayer, my heart was lifted up to God in prayer, that if a change of heart was necessary to salvation, I might be convinced of it that night.  The sermon was from the text, ‘Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.’  During the sermon, I felt that the foundations of my moral system were giving away, and that I must repent of even my self-righteousness, which I had thought would carry me to heaven.  When I went to bed that night, I felt that I was one of the worst kind of men.”
            The January following, 1815, being major of cavalry, he was ordered with the squadron to join the troops assembling in Darien to repel a threatened attack upon the place by the English.  The stirring scenes of military service would in all probability have erased from his mind the favorable impressions that had been made upon his heart just the month before, but God was watching over and guarding the good seed that had been sown in his heart.  When one day he was about to engage in drilling the squadron, he was taken suddenly ill and would have fallen from his horse, but was prevented by his aid and a very intimate and dear friend, Captain Joseph Jones, then commanding the Liberty Independent Troop, who took him from his horse and carried him to his quarters.  He continued very sick during the stay of the troops in Darien, and he was not able to return home until some time after the army was disbanded upon the declaration of peace.  The circumstance of his sudden attack impressed his mind deeply with the uncertainty of life and his entire unfitness for death.  As soon as he could ride he returned home, more deeply impressed with the necessity of a change of heart and more troubled about sin than when he left it.  He continued in a very distressed and dejected state of mind until the April following, when he found peace in believing in Jesus Christ.  A few days after indulging a hope, he applied to the Sunbury Baptist church for membership, and being received for baptism, he was, on the 30th of April, 1815, baptized by Rev. C.O. Screven, the pastor, and became a member of the church.  Years afterward, when reverting to this period of his life, I have heard him state that when he left his house to go to the church to relate his experience, he felt that his strength would fail him before he reached the meeting-house.  His feet seemed weighted with lead.  He felt that his mind was all darkness, that he had nothing to say, and he wondered why he was going.  After reaching the meeting, and he was called upon to relate what God had done for him, he arose and commenced, and though at first embarrassed, yet soon light burst in upon his mind.  His heart became filled with the love of  God, his tongue became loosed, and he knew not when or where to stop.  So affecting was the relation he gave of God’s merciful dealings with him, that there was not, I have heard an eye witness state, a dry eye in the house.  In the brief account he gives of his conversion, from which an extract has already been given, he thus speaks of his feelings after his conversion:  “I feel that I have been asleep for many years and have just awoke—all nature is more beautiful around me, whereas all was gloom and despair.  God has withdrawn far from me, and left me to myself because I did not desire the knowledge of his ways.  I had thought I would build up a system of morality to save myself, until he convinced me that it was without any foundation, and he overthrew it all at once, just when I was consoling myself that I was getting it to be a very perfect structure.  No man on earth could have convinced me of my error, and I did not attribute it to anything Mr. Flint said, or to his knowledge of the human heart, but that he was sent by God with such words in his mouth to convince me that I must repent of all my sins, and even of all my self-righteousness, and that I must build upon the chief corner-stone, Jesus Christ.  After my conversion, I commenced the worship of God in my family.  I had once before attempted it, but gave it up, considering it useless, but I now regard it as one of my most important duties and one of the greatest pleasures of life to acknowledge our sins before God, to ask for pardon, to return thanks for all his blessings, and to glorify his great name.  Indeed, I feel that I might as well try to live without food and sleep as to live without endeavoring to glorify God.”
            His connecting himself with a Baptist church was somewhat remarkable, as all his former prejudices were in favor of the pseudo-Baptists.  He had been brought up in the faith of pseudo-baptism.  His father was an Episcopalian, and all his brothers who had professed religion were members of a pseudo-Baptist church.  But he consulted not with flesh and flood, and taking his Bible for his guide, he followed what he believed to be its teachings.  This disposition to follow not men but the word of God, as the only infallible rule of faith and practice, which was thus clearly manifested in his first step in his christian life, governed him through the whole of it.  Conscious of great spiritual ignorance, but relying upon the safety of the direction with the promise annexed, “If any man lack wisdom, let him ask of God, who giveth liberally and upbraideth not,” he applied himself diligently to the study of the scriptures.  He asked and studied, and studied and asked again, and he asked and studied not in vain.  The almost worn out leaves of his Bible are witnesses of his constant application, and there are many now living who can testify to the thoroughness and soundness of his knowledge of the fundamental doctrines of the Bible.
            From the records of the Sunbury Baptist church we learn that he was elected clerk of the church in the place of Sumner Winn, resigned, on the 17th of August, 1816, a little more than a year after becoming a member.
            Having lost his second wife, he was married to Miss Temperance Wood, of Sunbury, on the 1st of December 1818.  By this marriage he had three children, of whom only one survives.
            May 15th, 1819, he was elected and ordained to the sacred office of deacon.  No one, perhaps , possessed more fully than he did the qualifications for his sacred office.  He “used the office of a deacon well,” for he did thereby “purchase to himself a good degree,” whethere by this be meant an elevated stations as a christian, or a higher post, the office of elder or bishop, and he did, sooner than christians generally, acquire great boldness in the faith.  In filling the office of a deacon, he did not limit himself to serving tables.  He freely and humbly exercised the gifts God had given him, having an ardent desire to glorify God in his day and generation.  The health of Mr. Screven being infirm, from a cancer in one of his eyes, he gave him much assistance in attending to the colored people of the church and congregation.  In the conference and social prayer meeting he expounded the scriptures and exhorted his brethren to diligence and perseverance in the divine life.  His precepts in the religious meeting were eminently enforced by his daily walk.  He labored diligently and perseveringly after that attainment in piety to which he exhorted his brethren.
            Having for several years exercised his gifts before the church, and having in the opinion of his brethren made considerable progress in knowledge and piety, and showing considerable aptness to teach, his brethren, in order to increase his usefulness, urged upon him the acceptance of a license to preach, which he did.  The first notice we have of his preaching as a licentiate is from a minute in the church records, dated November 19th, 1825, in which it is stated that he preached the  sermon preparatory to the Lord’s Supper—we presume because of the indisposition of the pastor.  On account of the great destitution of ministerial labor within the bounds of the Sunbury Baptist Association—many of the churches being almost entirely without the ministration of the word—the church called him to go forth as an evangelist, and to this end they invited a presbytery, which convened in the Sunbury Baptist church, December 27th, 1827, who, having examined him, proceeded to ordain him.  The presbytery consisted of William B. Johnson, D.D., elders Wilson Conner, Jacob Dunham, James Shannon, and the pastor, Charles O. Screven.
            It is with particular reference to the wants of the colored people on the seaboard, and the poor white churches of the Sunbury Association, that, in obedience to the call of his brethren, the subject of this sketch consented to assume the duties and responsibilities of the ministry.  This was the field of his choice, for the desire of his heart was to do good, and in this field he felt he could do the most good.  But the providence of God disappointed him in his design of confining his labors exclusively to this field.  The Rev. C.O. Screven becoming entirely disabled for preaching from the cancer in his eye, resigned the pastoral charge of the Sunbury Baptist church, May 16th, 1829.  The church, in her destitute situation, looked to him to go in and out before them, and to break unto them the bread of life.  He was unwilling to take the oversight of them, because, from his want of education, he felt that he was not qualified to be the religious teacher of such a congregation as then met in Sunbury for worship.  But rather than the church should suffer, and there being hundreds of colored people connected with it who must be taken care of, he determined, in the strength of the Lord, to take up the cross in their service.  In connection with this church, he also served, but not as pastor, the North Newport Baptist church, Liberty county.  Though, by this arrangement, his itinerating was curtailed, still I placed him, perhaps, more fully in one part of the field of his choice—the colored people; for there were a great many connected with the churches and congregations he now labored with.  To the colored people of the North Newport church and congregation he devoted the afternoon of every Sabbath he preached in that church.
            In the fall of 1830, his son, J.S. Law, returned from the North, where he had been pursuing a course of theological studies.  As the church could now be supplied without him, and still wishing to carry out his original plans, he gave up the charge of the church.  The following year, receiving a call from the North Newport church to become its pastor, he accepted the call, as this would not interfere with his plans, but further them, and took a letter of dismission from the Sunbury church to the former.  About this time the Rev. C.C. Jones commenced his labors among the colored people in Liberty county, and he found in him a warm, zealous and efficient supporter and fellow laborer.  Oh, how his heart leaped for joy when he first witnessed the performances of the colored children in the Sabbath-school, under the instruction of Mr. Jones.  He rejoiced, for in this system of instruction he saw the prospect of materially and permanently improving the moral character of our colored population.
            Three or four years before his death, he gave up the charge of the North Newport church and gave his whole time to preaching to the poor white churches in the back parts of Liberty county, and in some of the adjoining counties, and also to the colored people.
            We come now to the closing days of his life, which “were, indeed, dark, painful, distressing in the extreme.”
            From his strong frame, robust constitution, almost uninterrupted health and his habit of life, one would have judged that he certainly would have lived out the full measure of the days allotted to man in this life.  But, without any previous sickness, his health, without any apparent cause, began suddenly to decline in the summer of 1836.  The best medical advice was obtained upon the first indications of disease, but it was of no avail, for he continued gradually to waste away, in flesh and strength.  He suffered no pain, but experienced a most unpleasant and indescribably sensation in his left side, which he more than once said he would cheerfully exchange for acute pain.  He was not confined to his bed nor to the house during the first part of his sickness.  His appetite was good, and he experienced no inconvenience from eating whatever he relished.  Every remedy tried by his physicians failed, and they were at a loss to know what was the true nature or precise location of his disease.  To one of his physicians, who was speaking to him of the novelty and hidden nature of his complaint, he calmly replied, “God has a way to take every man out of the world, and the disease from which I am suffering is the way in which I am to go.”  He seemed fully impressed from the first of the attack that he should not recover.  He arranged all his worldly matters in the first stage of his sickness, and then dismissed them from his mind as things with which he had no more to do.  He often spoke of his approaching dissolution, and he truly spoke of it as one who was strong in the Lord.  No doubt overshadowed his faith—no fear disturbed his hope.  His soul rested with unshaken confidence in the merits of Christ for acceptance with God.  He was usually cheerful, yet it was the cheerfulness of the christian chastened to a temper becoming one who felt that the time of his departure was at hand.  Such being the uniform tenor of his mind during the summer and fall, how great was my astonishment when, on the 9th of January, 1837, at four o’clock in the morning, he had me called to him.*  When I came to his bedside, he told me, with the deepest distress, that he had been deceiving himself; that he had never known Christ.  He expressed himself in such a manner as induced me to ask him if he had been living in any secret sin.  He exclaimed, “God forbid!  I have never sinned knowingly, and intentionally against God since I professed the name of Jesus.  But,” said he, “I am lost, I shall be damned.”  I was so perfectly astounded I knew not what to say.  After a little pause, he again exclaimed, “But God will be glorified!”  I asked him if the thought that God would be glorified in his destruction gave him any satisfaction?  He replied, “Yes, the glory of God is all I desire, whether it be in my salvation or in my condemnation—if He be glorified, I am satisfied.”  I remarked to him that an unregenerate man could not feel so.  He answered, “My mind is much enlightened, but my heart is destitute of holiness.”  Finding it useless to argue the point with him, I turned the conversation so as to lead him to express himself upon the great love of Christ, his favorite theme.  It had the desired effect; he was soon melted into tears, and after a few moments became composed in his mind.  (* Rev. Josiah S. Law)
            The next day, Tuesday, he was still more gloomy than at any former period.  He said he was without hope and without God.  I told him his feelings were the result of his disease.  He replied, “Do not deceive yourself; I am a monument of God’s vengeance, and he will make me an example to all others.”  I took him to ride and tried in every way to divert his mind, but it was useless—dark melancholy seemed settled immovably on his mind.  For the first time I feared he was becoming insane.  He had not yet been confined to bed.  Though I hoped and prayed God would save his servant from such a terrible affliction as the loss of his reason, yet he saw fit to order otherwise.  On Friday morning the seal of insanity was fixed, blotting out all hope, and overshadowing the whole family with the deepest gloom.  On that terrible morning he became angry with me for praying for him during family worship.  He had not risen from his bed.  He called me to his bedside, and in the most preemptory manner commanded me never to pray for him again.  He refused his food, and gave such evidence of entire insanity that from that day until I closed his eyes in death I never left him.  To the inquiries of his friends who came to see him respecting his health, he had but one answer, “Lost, lost forever!”  His physician now blistered him extensively, which confined him to his bed, and which he never left until carried to the place appointed for all living.  For whole nights would he lie without closing his eyes, grinding his teeth and speaking in the most terrific language of the destruction that was coming upon him.  Sometimes he would rouse up from his slumbers at night and inquire, “Is it time or eternity?”  Upon being answered that it was still time, he would in the most thrilling manner exclaim, “Eternity! oh, eternity, eternity!”  During his derangement, which lasted until a few hours before his death, he had two lucid intervals.  Of one of them, the last before the day of his death, being the clearest and longest, though only lasting three hours, and the most satisfactory, I shall give a minute account of it:  On Wednesday morning, 1st of February, his paroxysm of insanity was unusually violent and he was entirely unmanageable.  He would not allow me to do anything for him, not even to approach his bead.  About midday I heard him say, as though speaking to himself, “I cannot give up Christ.”  He then beckoned me to him.  On going to him, he asked me if I thought he would ever give up Christ?  I replied, “No, I am satisfied that you cannot.”  He then said, “I shall never give him up.”  He asked me to pray for him, which I did.  I regarded this request as a good indication of returning reason, for it was the first time he had made such a request since the morning he angrily commanded me not to do it.  After prayer I recited several passages of scripture to him, with which he seemed much pleased.  Upon repeating the verse “I reckon that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which shall be revealed in us,” he exclaimed, “Glorious truth! delightful truth!”  I also repeated, “We are saved by grace, through faith, and that not of ourselves, it is the gift of God.”  He remarked, “Grace, grace, and only grace.”  I repeated many more suitable to his condition, which seemed to fill him with delight, and, what was a little remarkable, of every verse I quoted he would immediately tell me in what gospel or epistle and chapter it was, and its number.  Whilst engaged in this exercise I placed my fingers upon his pulse and found it so feeble I thought he was sinking.  Upon doing this he remarked to me, “I am almost gone.”  I asked him if his head had not been very much confused?  He replied, “Yes, but it is much clearer now.”  As soon as I was satisfied that he was himself, I called the family and told them his reason had returned, but I thought he was sinking fast.  He recognized the different members of the family.  About this time a very dear and intimate friend of his came to the house, and I asked him if he wished to see him?  He said “Yes.”  Upon his coming into the room he grasped his hand and thus spoke to him, “Have you come to see me?  Have you any hope?  What is your hope?  Oh, I beg you as a dying man not to put off repentance another day.  You see what a poor, wretched creature I should be if I had put off repentance to a dying bed.”  As soon as the brethren in Sunbury heard of his situation they came to see him.  He addressed them all affectionately by name and told them he was going home.  But his hour had not yet come.  He had not yet drunk to the full of the cup his heavenly father had given him to drink.  As soon as his fever returned, he lost himself and became as entirely deranged as ever.  His sufferings increased as he drew near his end.  On Saturday, the 4th, he was again more lucid in his mind, but it was very apparent that he was failing fast.  About two o’clock in the afternoon he suffered the most excruciating pains.  He would entreat us not to keep him, he was anxious to depart, for he felt that he rested upon the “Rock of Ages” and had no cause of fear.  From the last mentioned hour until eleven o’clock at night, when he closed his eyes in death, he had scarcely a moment’s ease.  During these hours of increased and increasing pain we were continually shifting his position, but he found no ease until death came.  Precisely at eleven o’clock p.m., 4th of February, 1837, I closed his eyes, and thus closed a scene of suffering and affliction which, thank God, is seldom felt or witnessed.  During the above scene I heard him indistinctly articulate, “Acts 7th,” had not time then to look for the passage, and in the wretched state of my mind I could not think of any verse in the chapter suited to his case, but it was evidently the fifty-ninth verse, “Lord Jesus, receive my spirit.”
            He was indeed baptized in sufferings, that he might, no doubt, rise to that far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory.  Oh, how sweet must have been his entrance into rest!  How gloriously great his transition from a world of suffering to a heaven of unspeakable bliss!
            It is not flattery, nor is it saying too much to state that few, if any, ever made more rapid progress in piety, and in the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ.  Neither is it said to his praise, but to the magnifying of that grace which made him what he was.  Religion was not with him a mere profession, neither was he governed by mere impulse in the discharge of its duties, but it was fixed in his heart as a living, abiding and sanctifying principle, impressing itself upon his character in every relation of life.  In the very beginning of his christian life, he made holiness of heart eh chief aim, and the service of God the great business of life; and to these two objects he devoted time, talents and property.  In the very outset, long before he entered upon the ministry, he gave much of his time to prayer and the study of the scriptures.  When business called him away from his study, he carried with him his pocket testament, that he might employ his leisure moments in reading and meditating upon diving truth.  He “searched the scriptures daily.”  He was in the habit of rising early in the morning and spending the time before the hour of family worship arrived in devotional exercises.  To this may be attributed the fervor and spirituality with which he conducted this delightful exercise.  He was ever careful to suffer nothing, aside form the providence of God, to interfere with worship in his family, morning and evening.  His domestic altar was held most sacred, and upon it he seemed ever anxious to lay his best sacrifice.  In conducting worship in his family, his custom was to accompany the portion of scripture read with some practical remarks, suited to the wants and understandings of his family.  He was, indeed, the christian in his house, seeking, by precept and example, to lead his children and servants to Christ.  In the church he seemed to have but one end in view—the honor and glory of Christ.  To his brethren he was kind, affectionate and faithful, sympathizing with them in their afflictions, warning them when careless, and reproving them when they offended.  He regarded it as a high privilege, as well as sacred duty, to aid his pastor in every way he could in advancing the cause of Christ.  In his intercourse with men of the world, he never lost sight of his calling as a christian, nor of the condition as sinners against God.  Hence, he never lost an opportunity of speaking a word for God.  So common was it with him to change conversation from worldly topics to those of a religious nature, that it was often said by his worldly acquaintances, “No matter what you talk about to Mr. Law, he will find something in it upon which to change the conversation to the subject of your soul’s salvation.”
            He attained unto great spirituality of mind, and if it be true that “out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaketh,” then was his heart full of the love of Christ, the holiness of God, and the blessings of salvation, for these subjects formed the burden of his conversation.  He was a most scrupulous observer of the Sabbath; he “remembered the Sabbath day to keep it holy.”  By Saturday evening sunset, all his worldly business was closed up and laid aside, and he commenced the preparation of his heart and mind for the duties of the approaching Sabbath.  So thoroughly was his mind trained to communion with diving things on this holy day that, on one occasion, after he entered the ministry, he was threatened with great pecuniary loss, from the failure of a friend for whom he had indorsed, which cost him much trouble and anxiety for weeks before he got through with it; and, though he was harassed and worried during the week, yet he told me afterwards that when the Sabbath came his mind was as perfectly calm and free from all disturbances of a worldly nature as it would have been had no difficulties existed.  He spoke of it as a manifestation of God’s goodness to him.
            During his christian course, he was called to pass through some dark and severe scenes of affliction.  By the besdise of an affectionate wife and five children has he been seen to stand, at different times, in all the calm serenity of submission to the will of God, and placing his hand upon their eyes closing in death, express the resignation of his soul in the solemn words of inspiration, “The Lord gave, and the Lord hat taken away; blessed by the name of the Lord.”  His confidence in God seemed never shaken.  The chastisements of his heavenly Father taught him not to love the world, nor the things of the world, and clothed him with humility as with a garment.  Such was his resignation under these afflictions that an intimate friend of his—a man of the world—upon one occasion of severe bereavement, remarked that his religion had destroyed his natural sensibilities.  But could that friend have witnessed the deep struggle, the bitter conflict between natural affection and the duty of submission to the will of God, he would have been constrained to acknowledge that the affections of the heart had not been impaired, but subdued to the recognition of a higher relation, for a more affectionate husband and father never lived.  He was a christian of the kindest and most benevolent feelings.  During season of severe sickness in Sunbury he was found day and night by the side of the sick and dying, administering to soul and body.
            As a christian master, he felt deeply the responsibilities of his station.  Frequently, upon visiting his plantation, he would call his servants off from their work and assemble them for religious instruction.  He often talked to them privately and personally respecting their soul’s salvation.  He treated those of his servants who professed religion as fellow christians.  He never punished them for misconduct before laying their case before the church.  He was an active and liberal supporter of all the benevolent institutions of the day.  He conscientiously gave according as the Lord had prospered him, and if the loss of a crop rendered stricter economy necessary, he economized in his family, and not in his contributions to the Lord.  He lived as one who was not his own, but bought with a price, even with the precious blood of Christ.
            As a preacher, it was not to be expected, inasmuch as he never received an education, was altogether unaccustomed to study, and did not enter the ministry until late in life, that he would have become what is usually termed a great preacher; but, under all disadvantages, it may, in strict truth, be said, he did become a good preacher, able to divide the word of truth aright, and to give each his portion in due season.  If to preach the word, be instant in season, out of season, reprove, rebuke, exhort, with all long suffering and doctrine, constitute a good minister of Jesus Christ, then was he one.
            His sermons were prepared with much care and study, in doing which he used no other help than a Bible, with Scott’s references.  It was in this way he studied the scriptures almost exclusively, interpreting scripture by scripture.  His sermons were sound and practical, generally well arranged, and often exhibit deep thought and much patient study.  Upon the great doctrine of “justification by faith” he dwelt much, and upon this subject he preached with great power.  In preaching upon all the fundamental doctrines of the gospel, he was free from all speculation, and from everything like an attempt to be wise above what is written.  He was content to give a plain, scriptural view of his subject and enforce the obvious duties it imposed on men.  In preaching, he showed great familiarity with the scriptures, quoting freely and accurately from them, and giving chapter and verse from memory.  In his delivery he was fluent, rapid and animated, always throwing his whole soul into the application of his discourses.  He was much gifted in prayer.  In witnessing his pulpit performances, one could not but feel that he was listening to a man who spake as though standing in the presence of the Great Head of the church.  He preached the gospel without charge to the churches, but with cost to himself; for, though he had a large family to provide for and educate, a small property to do it with, and somewhat in debt, making the most rigid economy necessary in order to get along, yet he paid another to attend to his business, that he might give himself wholly to the work of the ministry.  He trusted in the Lord, for in the Lord Jehovah he knew was everlasting strength.

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MERSHON, Judge M.L.
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 986 & 987.

            Judge M.L. Mershon, attorney at law, Brunswick, Glynn County, Georgia, son of William and Elizabeth (Brown) Mershon, natives of Hancock County, Georgia, was born in Monticello, Florida, 26 April 1839. The Mershons in this country are reputed to be descendants from a lad whose parents being Huguenots fled from France on the promulgation of the edict of Nantes. His parents having died during the voyage, he, after landing, was apprenticed in New Rochelle, New York. Enos Mershon, the Judge’s grandfather, was a native of Maryland.  Judge Mershon was educated in the common schools of Florida, came to Georgia in 1859, and shortly afterward settled in Brunswick. During 1859-60 he studied law, and in 1860 was admitted to the bar. He enlisted in 1861, and served through the war in the army of the west, mainly under Gens. Bragg and Hood.  Judge Mershon was a member of the constitutional convention of 1877; was subsequently elected judge of the Brunswick circuit court twice, but resigned in 1886 before the expiration of his second term, and went to south Florida and practiced law. In 1890 he returned to Brunswick, where he settled and resumed the practice of his profession, acquiring a fine reputation and securing a large practice. In 1892 he was elected to represent Glynn County in the general assembly in which body he made strenuous efforts to have a state board of health established.  Judge Mershon is highly esteemed as a lawyer and as a citizen, and is very popular with all classes of his fellow citizens.

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MOORE, C.G.
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 987.

            C.G. Moore, undertaker, Brunswick, Glynn County, Georgia, son of Benjamin and Percy (Stocking) Moore, was born in Litchfield, Connecticut, 13 March 1832. His great-great grandfather was an Irishman; his great grandmother was a Miss Collier, who was born in Scotland. While Mr. Moore was yet young his father had the misfortune to lose his eyesight, and at the tender age of thirteen he started out to solve the problem of life. He was for awhile in New Haven, and while there was a member of the New Haven Blues. In 1855 he came to Georgia, and located in Thomasville. He was in the employ of the Atlantic & Gulf (now Savannah, Florida & Western) Railway, and during the war was foreman of the machine shops. In 1866 he permanently established himself in Brunswick, where he has been satisfactorily successful. Not being much inclined to office-holding, he has filled but one, and that was as an alderman of the city for three years. He has established a good business, and is the leading undertaker and director of funerals in the city.  Mr. Moore was married in 1866 to Miss Sarah, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Smith, of Patchogue, Long Island, New York. Her mother, Mrs. Abbie (Tuttle) Smith, is still living, and at the advanced age of ninety-five can read the New York “Herald” without the aid of glasses. Three children blessed this union: Mary (Mrs. Valentine), Sarah Jane (Mrs. Graham), and William Benjamin.  Mrs. Moore died 6 October 1876 of yellow fever, and in November, 1878, Mr. Moore married Miss Annie E. Brooks, a native of Wiscasset, Maine. Mr. Moore is a member of the Methodist Church, and Mrs. Moore is an Episcopalian.

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NELSON, Eugene A.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" page 610

            Eugene A. Nelson, city clerk and treasurer of Brunswick, was born in Houston County, Ga., April 12, 1858.  He is a son of James F. Nelson, whose sketch appears in this work, and in that sketch will be found the facts touching the early family history.
            The subject of this sketch was educated at Dawson and Brunswick, Ga., and at Warford’s College at Spartansburg, S.C.  He began his career as a merchant in Brunswick, Ga., and followed this business up to 1881, when, his father and brother having built the Ocean Hotel at Brunswick, he gave up merchandising and took charge of that house and ran it till the fall of 1884.  At this time he was elected clerk of the superior court.  He held this office, together with those of county school commissioner and clerk of the commissioners of roads and revenues, till January, 1888, when he resigned the first-mentioned office to accept the office of clerk and treasurer of the city of Brunswick, made vacant by his father’s resignation.
            Mr. Nelson is a man who is admirably fitted by nature and by his early training for clerical positions.  He is systematic, close, attentive and business-like in everything; and his integrity is beyond question, as the citizens of Brunswick have testified by their repeated bestowals on him of places of honor and trust.  He has filled his offices creditably, especially that of county school commissioner, having been largely instrumental in developing the public school system of which Brunswick now boasts, and which constitutes not the least of that proud city’s possessions.
            September 7, 1882, Mr. Nelson married Miss Dollie Ivey, of Brunswick.
            He belongs to the Knights of Pythias and the Knights of Honor and to the Baptist Church, in all of which he takes an active interest and has held positions of trust.

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NELSON, James F.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" page 609

            James F. Nelson was born in Twiggs County, Ga., August 30, 1833.  His family is of English extraction, being related to the late Lord Nelson, who fought and put to rout “all the might of Denmark’s crown.”  His grandfather was a native of Virginia, but settled with his family at an early day in Georgia.  Alfred Nelson was our subject’s father.  He was born in Virginia, but reared in Georgia, where he was a planter all his life.  Mr. Nelson’s mother was a Miss Jenkins before marriage, her christian name Mary, and she was a daughter of William Jenkins, a successful planter of Houston County, Ga.  His brothers and sisters are:  John Nelson, planter of Pulaski County, Ga.; Martin, a lumberman of Houston County, Ga.; Margaret, wife of N.C. Greer, of Brunswick, Ga.; Rebecca M., wife of Columbus Mitchell, sheriff of Wilcox County, Ga.; Caroline S., wife of Columbus Murray, a planter of Coffee County, Ga.; Fannie Pugh, widow.  Mr. Nelson received a common-school education in Perry, Houston County, Ga., and finished by taking an academical course at Holly Springs, Ga.  On quitting the latter place he began teaching, and followed this successfully for a number of years, first in Houston County then at Midway, and then at Dawson.  He gave up teaching in 1868, and embarked in the general mercantile business, which he followed for one year at Dawson, and moved in 1870 to Brunswick, Ga., where he continued in the same business for the period of twelve years.  At the end of that time he closed out his mercantile interests and in connection with his sons built the Ocean Hotel at that place, then the largest hotel in the city.  He was interested in the management of this house for some time, but afterward sold out, and, on account of his failing health, moved to Florida and located in Orlando.  During his residence in Brunswick he was for six years an alderman of the city, for four years mayor, and for five years clerk and treasurer, and on there the city council presented him with a beautiful golden crowned staff in grateful remembrance of his faithful services while filling these various offices.  Mr. Nelson married Miss Martha Ann Summerford, daughter of William Summerford, planter of Dooly County, Ga.  To this union have been born four children:  Annie May, wife of H.H. Dickson, of Orlando, Fla.; Eugene A., of Brunswick, Ga., whose sketch appears in this work; James F. Jr., conductor on the B. & W. R.R., and William H., in the printing business in New York city.  Mr. Nelson is a Mason and a zealous member of the Baptist Church.

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NEWMAN, Tobias
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 987 & 988.

            Tobias Newman, wholesale liquor merchant, Brunswick, Glynn County, Georgia, son of Eberhard and Marguerite (Williams) Newman, was born in Germany, 22 October 1848. His parents were natives of Hanover, Germany, where they lived and died, the father in 1886, aged seventy years, and the mother in 1890, aged sixty-eight years.  Capt. Newman came to the United States when only thirteen years old, and followed the sea in the commercial marine service for seven years, when he went on the revenue cutter “Petrel” as quartermaster, and served in that capacity two years. In 1869 he went into business in Columbus, Georgia, and remained there until 1886, when he went to Brunswick and established himself in his present enterprise, continuing that in Columbus until 1890. Beginning life a mere boy and poor, he has, as the results of the national traits of his race--patient industry and frugality--built up a profitable business and accumulated a handsome competency. Capt. Newman married in 1869 to Miss Jennie Evens, born in Apalachicola, Florida, daughter of Jack and Mary Evens. Mr. and Mrs. Evens were natives of Ireland. To Capt. and Mrs. Newman eight children were born: George, Mollie, Nettie, Maggie, Josephine, Walter, Tobias, Jr., and Eberhard.  Mrs. Newman is a Catholic.  Capt. Newman is a member and the captain of Oglethorpe Division No. 4, uniform rank, Knights Pythias. He was the proud and exultant winner of the division prize--$200 cash--for the best drilled company. He is very enthusiastic in regard to everything pertaining to the military company to which he belongs and with whose members he is very popular. He is very much respected in Brunswick as a citizen and business man.

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OGG, Charles D.
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 988 & 989.

            Charles D. Ogg, merchant broker, Brunswick, Glynn County, Georgia, son of Richard T. and Nannie (Anderson) Ogg, was born in Louisa County, Virginia 9 December 1859. His parents were natives respectively of Goochland and Louisa Counties, Virginia. His father is still living in Louisa County, aged about sixty-seven years; but his mother died in 1882, when about forty-eight years old. They had three children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the second, and is the only survivor.  Mr. Ogg was educated in the private schools of Rockbridge County, Virginia, and Richmond College, Richmond, Virginia. He began his business life when only thirteen years old, on his father’s farm; his father being a railroad man placed the farm in charge of the boy on strict business principles--for a consideration. His father, however, paid for his education; this and his home experience was all the capital he had. What he has now of property an enviable reputation is the result of his own efforts. Prior to 1882 he taught school four sessions and then engaged as a clerk in the general office of the C & O Railway in Richmond. While thus employed he studied and learned shorthand. About 1883 he went to Hinton, West Virginia, as stenographer of the Huntington Division of the C & O. In 1885 Mr. Ogg was made chief clerk in the office under E.H. Barnes, superintendent of that division. In March, 1886, he accompanied Mr. Barnes to Atlanta as chief clerk in his office, he having received the appointment of superintendent of the Atlanta and Brunswick Division of the East Tennessee, Virginia & Georgia Railway. In October of that year Mr. Ogg was appointed general agent at Jesup, Wayne, County, Georgia, for the same road; and in December, 1888, he was transferred to Brunswick, where he served the company as agent until 1 May 1890. On that date he retired and embarked with Mr. B.A. Hancock in the merchandise brokerage business under the firm name Hancock & Ogg. Dissolving his connection with Mr. Hancock he entered in partnership with R.F. Bowles in September, 1890, in the same business, the firm being R.F. Bowles & Co. In February,1892, he bought the Bowles interest and since then has had entire control. His sales annually aggregate the handsome sum of $250,000. Besides valuable real estate and bank and other stocks in Brunswick, Mr. Ogg is largely interested in real estate in Kansas City, Missouri. He is a stockholder and director of the Merchants’ and Traders’ Bank and a member of the discount board. He is a director and chairman of the transportation committee of the board of trade. He has been at the head of several delegations to present Brunswick’s grievances to the railroad commission in Atlanta, particularly in January and February, 1893. Interested parties had secured rates favorable to other competing points extremely prejudicial to Brunswick; and to the strong and persistent efforts of Mr. Ogg is mainly due the credit of securing an equitable adjustment and a restoration of the old rates. He was also one of the delegates from Brunswick to the first direct trade meeting in Savannah in February, 1893.  Mr. Ogg is an ardent and enthusiastic Mason--senior warden of the “blue lodge;” and has recently been instrumental in establishing a chapter of royal arch Masons, of which he is P.S.  Mr. Ogg’s steady, continuous and rapid promotion from the time he entered upon railway work until he retired from it, is conclusive proof of his industry and his fidelity to the interests of the company and of their appreciation of his services; while his splendid success since he entered upon his present business, and the important and responsible positions he has held and now holds in commercial and fraternal organizations and banking institutions bear gratifying and unmistakable testimony to his business sagacity and sterling integrity of character.

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LITTLEFIELD, Sylvanus Clark
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 522-523

            HON. S.C. LITTLEFIELD, of the firm of Littlefield & Tison, general merchants at Brunswick, Ga., and agents for the New York and Brunswick Packet Line, is a native of Eaton, Carroll County, N.H., and was born May 9, 1834, and is a son of Dudley and Priscilla Littlefield, both natives of Wells, Maine.  Dudley Littlefield was born May 27, 1799, the son of Stephen, and was a farmer until his death in 1884.  Mrs. Priscilla Littlefield, daughter of Aaron Bragdon, died at the age of eighty-five years and eleven days.  The Littlefield family is traced to its ancestry in England, but the first in this country was Edmond Littlefield, who had eight children, five sons and three daughters, viz.:  Francis, Anthony, Elizabeth, John, Thomas, Mary, Hannah and FrancisEdmond Littlefield, together with his son Anthony, came over from Southampton in the year 1637.  His wife, together with the seven other children, came over in May, 1638; landed in Boston, Mass., but settled in Wells, Me.  S.C. Littlefield is the second of three children, still living, born to his parents the others being Stephen and Tobias.  He settled in Georgia at the age of nineteen, attended school at Perry, Houston County, and also attended Emory College at Oxford.  In 1857 he engaged in the timber business with an uncle, continued in that trade about a year, and later put up a sawmill in Screven County, and another in Burke County, and operated both until 1861, when he discontinued milling and enlisted in the Independent Partisan Rangers, which company was subsequently merged into the Seventh Georgia cavalry.  In about two months he was detailed to start up his mills again and cut some diamond shaped lumber for the Fingall gunboat, the Ladies gunboat, etc., and, in fact was employed by the government all through the war to prepare lumber for different purposes.  In 1867 he moved to Brunswick and engaged in the general commission business and dealing in all kinds of builder’s supplies, and is now one of the largest and most successful commission merchants in the city.  For eight years he has been chairman of the commissioners of pilotage; he is a director in the Brunswick Building and Loan Association, has been city alderman eight years, and was one of the commissioners of the school board four years.  While acting in this last named capacity he induced the commissioners to enter suit for the recovery of forty lots belonging to the school fund, and after some hard fighting the suit was won.  October 14, 1861, Mr. Littlefield married Miss Emma C. Stanley, daughter of Robert R. and Emma C. Stanley, of Greenville, Ala., and this union has been blessed with five children, as follows:  Priscilla B., Robert R., Mary Lillian, Sylvanus C. and Emma S.  The family are members of the Episcopal Church.  Mr. Littlefield is a Free Mason and has served as worshipful master of Ocean Lodge, No. 214.  In politics he is a Democrat.

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McCULLOUGH, John H.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 535-536

            JOHN H. McCULLOUGH, lumber merchant of Brunswick, Ga., was born in Cecil County, Md., October 28, 1844.  His father, William McCullough, was a native of the same place and was born in 1806; was a lumber dealer, was sheriff of the county in 1833, and was a member of the convention that met in Baltimore, in 1851, to ratify the laws of Maryland.  He died in 1861.  The mother of our subject was Miss Martha McCullough before her marriage to William McCullough, but although bearing the same name was not related by consanguinity.  She was also born in Cecil County, Md.  Mr. and Mrs. William McCullough were the parents of seven children, born in the following order:  George, Allen, Caroline, Martha, John H., William and MaryJohn H. McCullough received a very good education in his native county of Cecil, Md., and in 1870 settled in Brunswick, Ga., his present place of residence, where he engaged in the lumber trade; he handles chiefly yellow pine, and ships to all parts of the world, but principally to South America.  To show the vastness of his trade, it may be mentioned that, in 1887, he shipped from the port of Brunswick twelve million feet of lumber, which was the lowest shipment he ever made in one year, his previous shipments having reached as high as twenty-two million feet per annum.  January, 1874, Mr. McCullough married Miss Haddie Parker, of Cecil County, Md., daughter of William Parker, and by her is the father of four children, born in the following order:  Retta, Malcolm, Mary, and HaddieMr. McCullough is a Master Mason, and is also a director in the Oglethorpe National Bank of Brunswick.

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NOBLE, William D.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 613-614

            WM. NOBLE, D.D.S, of Waycross, Ga., was born in Lee County, Ga., January 29, 1851, and is the son of Romulus and Ceily A. (Clements) Noble, both natives of Georgia.  Romulus Noble was a graduate of the Philadelphia Dentla College, and died in Brunswick, Ga., a member of the Methodist Church and the Knights of Pythias.
            William Noble is the eldest of a family of twelve children, and was educated in Americus, Ga.  He studied dentistry with his father, and has been in practice in south Georgia and Florida since 1868.  He is quite eminent in his profession and stands high in the estimation of the people.  In August, 1874, he was married to Miss Catherine F. Whelden.  Their union has been blessed by the birth of four children, viz.:  Katie, Ista V., Cornett and William J.  The doctor is a member of the I.O.O.F. and the Knights of Pythias.

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PALMER, John T.
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 989.

            John T. Palmer, boot and shoe merchant, Brunswick, Glynn County, Georgia, son of Dr. John T. and Amanda (Barbour) Palmer, was born in Lumpkin, Stewart County, Georgia, 27 December 1851.  His grandparents were John and Nancy (Flood) Palmer, of Waterford, Ireland.  Mr. Palmer’s father and two brothers and an uncle came from Ireland to the United States in 1832, and located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  His grandfather, although a man of some means, believed it best for each of his sons to be master of some trade, so he remained in Pittsburgh three years that he might accomplish his object.  Mr. Palmer’s father learned the trade of tailor, and after “graduating,” migrated to Athens, Georgia, went thence to Washington, Georgia, and finally in 1849, went to Lumpkin, Georgia.  Here he studied medicine under Dr. Thomas Battle, and entering the field of practice, achieved quite a success.  He volunteered at the beginning of the war and was appointed assistant surgeon of the Seventeenth Georgia Regiment, and remained in the army until after the battle of Chickamauga.  Having contracted pneumonia by exposure during the battle, his health failed and he resigned in 1864.  He died the next year.  Dr. Palmer was a very enthusiastic Mason, and had taken all the degrees except the thirty-third; and he held many positions of honor and trust in the fraternity.  He numbered among his particular friends, Alex H. Stephens, “Bob” Toombs, and many other prominent men of the state and nation.  He was a member of the Methodist Church, took great interest in all its work, was a class leader and an enthusiastic Sunday school worker.  Mr. Palmer, the subject of this sketch, started in business life as a clerk at the age of nineteen, with R.C. Black, Americus, Georgia, and steadily advanced in his line until now he has become the leading dealer in Brunswick in every style and grade of footwear, with a good start and a bright promise of a competency in the near future.  In 1878, Mr. Palmer married Laura, daughter of Capt. J.W. Sealy, a native of Marion County, Georgia, but now a prominent citizen of Cuthbert, Georgia.  To them four children have been born: John Sealy; Helen Amanda; Marion Dunwoody; and Lucien Key.  Mr. and Mrs. Palmer are members of the Methodist Church.

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PARKER, John L.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" page 633

            JOHN L. PARKER, merchant, Jesup, Ga., was born in Lee (now Terrell) County, Ga., May 25, 1834, and is a son of Wm. J. and Alletha (Lawhorn) Parker, both natives of Georgia.
            the father is still living in Florida with his youngest son, Marcellus H.  He was born May 23, 1812, and is a member of the Lutheran Church.  The mother died in December, 1883, a member of the same church.
            Our subject was educated in the country schools of southwestern Georgia, and began for himself in 1855, as a mechanic.  He was thus engaged until November 9, 1861, when he enlisted in the Savannah State troops for a term of six months.  May 14, 1862, he enlisted for three years, or until the war closed, in the Second Georgia cavalry, under Capt. T.H. Jordan, of company G.  He took part in the battles of Murfreesboro, under Gen. N.B. Forrest, where his brigade opened the fight.  He was in all the skirmishes of Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Chickamauga and Tunnel Hill, and went into winter quarters at Dalton in 1863-64.  May 8, 1864, they commenced fighting at Rockyface Ridge, later Dug-gap, Snake Creek Gap, Resaca, Adairsville, Calhoun and many other engagements from there to Atlanta.  From December, 1862, until April 26, 1865, he was courier for Gen. B.F. Chatham, when he was released, owing to the terms of the military conference between Gens. Joseph E. Johnston and W.T. Sherman, at Greensboro, N.C., where he was paroled.  At this time he received $1.25, which was captured from the C.S.A. treasury on its way from Richmond.  Said twenty-five cents was expended, but the dollar he has in his possession yet.  After the war he returned to Terrell County and began the milling business, and engaged in both the saw and milling business from 1869 to 1873.  Since the latter date he served six years in railroad business [sic] as yard boss at Jesup and Jacksonville, in the S.F. & W. employ.  He then worked at other business three or four years, and the past three years at merchandising, with fair success.
            Mr. Parker’s success in life is the more commendable from the fact that it has been attained after the endurance of many hardships and disadvantages.
            He was married September 13, 1860, to Miss Helen Ann, daughter of John P. Hobbs.  Both Mr. and Mrs. Parker are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

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PARKER, Thomas A.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 634-635

            THOMAS A. PARKER, attorney, Baxley, Ga., was born April 3, 1859, in Liberty County, Ga., and his parents are Hampton C. and Catherine (Baggs) Parker, both born and reared in Liberty County.  The parents are still living, aged respectively sixty and fifty-six years, and are pioneer settlers of the county.  Mr. Parker’s grandfather, William Parker, emigrated from Barnwell District, S.C., and died about 1840.  William’s wife was Susan Hiers, who died about 1858.  These parents had ten children (see Wm. C. Parker).
            Thomas A. Parker received his education in the schools of Liberty County.  He read law under Hon. J.I. Carter, now solicitor general of Brunswick circuit, and was admitted to the bar in March, 1886.  He has been practicing in Baxley and other courts and has been doing fairly well.  He was notary public two years, then resigned.  He was appointed by the judge by the judge solicitor of the county court several months since.  He was married, in 1881, to Miss Mollie V., daughter of James and Jane (Robinson) Sellers, the former a farmer and still living in Appling County, Ga.
            The home of our subject and wife has been made happy in the birth of three children, viz.:  Allie Augusta, James H. and Daniel M.  Both parents are members of the Independent Order of Good Templers, also of the Missionary Baptist Church.  Mr. Parker is a gentleman of sound integrity, and has won the confidence of his neighbors and all with whom he has had business by his upright character and fair dealing with men.

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PARKER, William C.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 633-634

            WM. C. PARKER, merchant, Baxley, Ga., was born in Liberty County, Ga., September 5, 1854, and his parents are Hampton C. and Catherine (Baggs) Parker, both Georgians.  Hampton C. Parker is a farmer and a good one, honored and respected by his entire acquaintance.  Later he added the lumber business to his farming interests.  He was for many years judge of the old inferior court, for one term represented his district (Tattnall, Liberty and McIntosh counties) in the senate, and has served for years as president of the board of education of his county.  Mr. and Mrs. Parker are still living, honored and respected citizens of their county.  They have had ten children, namely:  Amanda E., William C., Joseph H., Thomas A., Matilda C., Anna S., David G., John W., James E. and Charles H.  Of these, Amanda E., wife of Joseph W. Hughes, died in August, 1885, having lived an exemplary christian life; Joseph H., consort of Anna Terry, is living in Liberty County; Thomas A., is practicing law in the town of Baxley; Matilda C., is living in Blackshear, wife of W.T. Hughes; David G., died in July, 1886, aged twenty-one years.  He was a christian gentleman of much promise, was financial secretary in the lodge of G.T., was secretary of the Baptist Sunday School and a member in good standing in the Baptist Church.  Anna S., John W., James E. and Charles H. are living with their parents.
            William C. Parker was educated in the ordinary country schools and at Bradwell Institute at Hinesville, Ga.  he graduated from the latter in the class of 1878, and began business by teaching eighteen months; then embarked in the mercantile business in Baxley, in 1880, and has been there since.  He was appointed postmaster in 1880 and continued in that position until 1888.  He was married May 4, 1881, to Miss Sarah B., daughter of Dr. J. Homer and Lucinda Mattox of Homerville, Ga., (the town of Homerville is named for him).  Two children, M. Kate and Homer C., bless this union.  Mr. and Mrs. Parker are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.  He is serving very acceptably his second term as recorder of the town, Baxley.  His social standing is of the bests, and he has proven himself a man of marked ability in the important offices which he has been called to fill.  His morals are irreproachable, and he is one of Appling County’s substantial and uncompromising citizens.

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PHILLIPS, Capt. John A.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 657-659

            CAPT. JOHN A. PHILLIPS was born in Montgomery County, Ga., July 28, 1836.  His parents were Anthony and Sarah (Sullivan) Phillips, both Georgians.  The father was a farmer, stock, timber and large real estate owner.  He was judge of the inferior court of Emanuel County, where he lived for years.  He died in 1880, aged seventy-two, a member of the Baptist Church.  His wife died in 1881, aged sixty-eight, also a member of the Baptist Church.  Their children were—Wm. C., married Miss Elizabeth Williamson, living in Emanuel County; subject; Lucretia, consort of Rev. Knight, of Emanuel County; her former husband was Manning Herington; Francis, living in Emanuel County, married Miss Jane Warnock, of Burke County.  The subject was educated in the schools of the county and began for himself at the age of sixteen, speculating until the war in slaves, cotton and everything else salable.  His success was good until the war.  He was agent and stock-holder of the “timber Cutters’ Bank,” Savannah, and had the use of the money.  He continued this until 1862, when he raised a company for the confederate service and paid them a bounty of fifty dollars each in Timber Cutters’ money.  He belonged to the Thirty-second Georgia regiment of infantry, took part in the Ocean Pond battle, Ft. Wagner, Cumminses Point, also in the bombardment of Sumter and was among the last troops that left it.  He passed ahead of Sherman through the Carolinas and surrendered with the command at Greensborough, N.C., after four days’ marching and starvation, not having had a thing to eat except a little corn which was stolen from the horses.  The sharpshooting behind prevented much of the falling out of ranks that was expected under the circumstances.  He was neither wounded nor taken prisoner.  After the surrender he walked from Newbury home to Augusta, Ga., arriving the latter part of May, 1865.  He stood army life well, and had no sickness except pneumonia at Sullivan’s Island, by which he was detained from service for about a month.  After the close of the war he speculated in cotton in Burke, Montgomery and Emanuel counties; picking it up here and there and hauling it to Savannah with teams; later cutting timber and rafting it to Darien.  He continued this for two years and was worth from six to seven thousand.  He went into partnership with Carl Epping, of Savannah, the firm being “Carl Epping & Co.”  Their business was cotton buying and selling, timber cutting and shipping.  He continued this two years with good success, then he bought out Epping and ran alone one year, when he took in as partner, J.J. McArthur, which association continued two years.  He then engaged in the guano business, in which he lost heavily by trusting others.  In 1872 he moved to Darien and engaged in general merchandising.  Success was good until a destructive fire destroyed everything in December, 1874; as he had no insurance this left him in debt about $3,000.  He then moved to Sterling Station and opened a boat and hack line from Sterling Station to Darien in connection with the Macon & Brunswick Railroad, built a hotel at the Station, kept hotel, hack and boat, and carried the U.S. mail also.  He continued that and speculating in lands until 1885.  he then built a station eight miles above and opened a road to the river in connection with the boat.  In 1886 he moved to Jesup.  He then ran the Altamaha hotel for some time and then moved to Lumber City.  The past two years he has been railroad contracting and dealing in real estate with good success.  He was married in 1862 to Miss Florence Warnock, of Burke County.  She died in 1864, aged eighteen years.  She was a devout member of the Methodist Church.  His second marriage was in 1868, to Miss Margaret E. McArthur, sister of Walter McArthur (see elsewhere).  His home has been made happy in the birth of two children, Ida E. and Sadie, both of whom are in the junior year of the Wesleyan at Macon.  Mr. Phillips is a member of no church, but his family are members of the Methodist Church.  Mr. Phillips is a man of energy, push and good business qualifications.  Our glory consists not so much in never falling but rather in rising every time we fall.

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PUTNAM, A.T.
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 989 & 990.

            A.T. Putnam, livery stableman and real estate dealer, Brunswick, Glynn County, Georgia, related by blood to the revolutionary hero, Gen. Israel Putnam, is the son of Willis and Amanda (Thompson) Putnam, and was born about ten miles from Gainesville, Hall County, Georgia, 27 December 1836.  Mr. Putnam’s father was born in Virginia, and was a descendant of one of the three brothers who emigrated to this country before the eighteenth century, two of whom were named John and Israel, the last named probably the father of Gen. Putnam, who was born in Salem, Massachusetts, 7 January 1718, whose hazardous and courageous exploits of attacking a wolf in its den and escaping from the British by riding down a precipitous rock stairway numbering several hundred steps, and extraordinary bravery during the war, are familiar to all readers of American history. His mother was a daughter of Andrew Thompson. She was born 13 November 1820, and died 4 October 1841.  Mr. Putnam received but ten months’ schooling at his father’s expense; all besides he paid for himself. When fifteen years old he began the battle of life--left to his own resources--and for the first twelve months he was paid $40. He was a messenger for Gov. J.E. Brown in Milledgeville, and in 1861 accompanied Gov. Brown to Atlanta. He served some time with the state troops; but in January, 1863, he enlisted in Company E, Twenty-second Georgia Battalion, served through the war and was paroled at Augusta, he being home at the time on a furlough. After the war he settled in Brunswick, where, by enterprise and unusual sagacity in making investments, he has accumulated quite a fortune, including among other valuable property, and entire block of brick buildings. He lost $55,000 by the war. He has served the city as alderman about ten years.  Mr. Putnam was married to Miss Mary Harton, of Putnam County, Georgia, 1 February 1861, who bore him three children, one of whom only is living. His wife died in 1880. Mr. Putnam contracted a second marriage in 1881, with Miss Viola Johnson, of Houston County, by whom he has had two children, of whom only one is living, Etta. Both the wives of Mr. Putnam were nieces of the late W.B. Johnson, a wealthy capitalist of Macon, Bibb County, Georgia.  Mr. and Mrs. Putnam are active and liberal and consequently influential members of the Missionary Baptist Church. The congregation has recently erected a beautiful house of worship which cost about $40,000. Mr. Putnam was chairman of the building committee and contributed largely toward its construction, in addition to which he has become personally responsible for an unpaid balance due on it. Mr. Putnam is a master Mason and a member of the I.O.O.F. He has passed through all the chairs of the last named fraternity, and represented his lodge at the grand encampment. He is also a member of the Legion of Honor. The practical foresight of Mr. Putnam is demonstrated by his carrying a heavy life insurance policy.

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ROBINSON, Carrie (Maxwell) Roberts
by Amy Hedrick

            One of the most intriguing aspects of my genealogy and history research in Glynn County, Georgia is the oral histories of families that lived in the “country”, where roads are not paved and gas stations do not exist.  In all of our coastal histories that have been written, much reflection and thought goes into the telling of the affluent and/or about St. Simons Island.  But what about the folks that made everyday life for these individuals bearable?  The housekeepers, the golf caddies, the groundskeepers, the common laborers?
            Many stories have been told about island plantations but not many about the county plantations such as Myers, Laurel Grove, Bonaventure, Bethel, Oak Grove, Dover Hall, Anguilla, and many more.  Recently I met a woman who, although she hasn’t much information on her slave ancestors, has a rich history of family and growing up in Brunswick in the 1920s and 30s.
            Carrie Maxwell was born 12 April 1911 to Sheppard and IsabellaBell” (Hill) Maxwell of Brookman Community, Glynn Co., Georgia.  Her maternal grandparents were Aaron and Mary Ann (Pinkney) Hill; she is unsure who her paternal grandparents are, and has no knowledge of any other ancestors.  According to my research her paternal grandparents were Sam Maxwell and Mary Hippard (both born slaves); her grandmother was a slave of the Scarlett family on a plantation named Oak Grove.  Mary's brother, Columbus, was a veteran of the Civil War serving the with the Navy for the Union.
            Carrie grew up poor but rich in everything that matters:  family, friends, and a sense of belonging.  Her earliest memories are of going to Sunday School and church at the New Hope Methodist Church on Emanuel Church Road in Brookman.  Although there weren’t many neighbors, the folks that did live there lived in unity, white and black alike; everyone helped those in need, there were no distinctions of race or class.
            As a child Carrie was very ill, suffering mainly from asthma, and wasn’t allowed to play or run around with the other children unless she was supervised which rarely happened for in those days, nearly everyone in the family worked around the house.  Her baby brother C.L. Maxwell [may be Christopher] had just died as an infant so Carrie was bedridden a lot as a child for fear she may unexpectedly die young.  When she was very ill, if her mother wasn’t nearby to come to her calls, she would thrash around and pull the bed sheets from the bed until her mother came running.
            One day, while unable to "find" her mother, her grandpa Aaron [who was deceased] appeared to her from out of nowhere. He sat down on her bedside, crossed his legs [a family trait], and told young Carrie to “Hush now, Bell will be right back, there is no need to be scared.”  He then uncrossed his legs and walked away.  When Isabella returned from the neighbor’s house Carrie had a wonderful story to tell of grandpa coming to ease her woes.  Isabella asked Carrie “Were you scared?”  Carrie replied “No, he was very nice mama, he talked to me and assured me that you would be right back.”  Isabella then told Carrie that "It's a good thing that you weren’t, because if you had been, he would have taken you with him!"
            Carrie was one of 11 children born to Sheppard and Bell Maxwell, others were C.L. who died young, Irene [Atkinson], Inez [Harrison], Alvin, Sam, Anna May [Chrysler], Sheppard Jr., Janie [Parland], Frederick, and Gussie [Cash].  Gussie and Carrie were three years apart in age but were like twin sisters, they were always together playing and working; they were the best of friends.
            All of the kids got along as well as children do and of course, as children do, teasing others was not missing from their list of things to do when bored.  Unfortunately for them, Carrie and Gussie were on the heavy side as children so the other girls liked to torment them by putting them in girdles and lacing them up nice and tight.  Generally, the kids did what country children did in the early 1900's, they utilized their surroundings and incorporated that into their play, there were no parks or recreation buildings, just trees, water, and land, lots of land.  Mostly they would swing, play with their toys, swim, and Carrie enjoyed playing croquet; however, swimming was and still is her passion.
            Her father owned quite a bit of land in Brookman and they farmed for themselves and for spending money; many folks would come out that way on July 4th to buy watermelons for their picnics. There were also cows, horses, hogs, everything that made a farm work, and Carrie especially loved the cows as they provided her favorite beverage, milk.  With two eggs and a pinch of nutmeg she drank milk like it was going out of style!  Her mother was worried about her because she hardly ate anything substantial but the doctor said she was doing just fine with her milk and eggs.
            One question I like to ask folks, one my father refused to answer, is “What is the worst thing you did as a child that resulted in punishment?”  Carrie would steal the milk that her mother had set aside to make butter with.  Carrie loved milk so much that she would wake up in the morning, put on her house coat, grab her mug, and walk out to the barns to get milk from the cows before she did anything else.  Bell hated that she did this because the milk wasn’t clean yet but Carrie persisted until she got her morning mug.
            Most all farms had dogs running around, and the Maxwell family farm was not exempt; there were always well bred dogs and puppies to play with that were the main family pet.  Throughout her life Carrie would always have a dog in her home.
            During the holidays, what little the family had, they made up in great style.  Christmastime involved an exchange of gifts and a family dinner.  Carrie usually got a doll or some clothes, the dolls were her favorite gift, she still collects them to this day and when she made her first home she covered her bed in them.  So many dolls that visitors would stare in wonder at the lack of household items but all those dolls, most would say “Is that all you got?”
            When not in school or working on the farm, free time was filled by social dances, that were held by the local church, and movies that were playing in town.  There were two theatres to choose from, the Ritz, and the Bijou theatre; the latter Carrie now lives right across from on Albany Street.
            Named after a white woman in the community, Carrie had all that a young child could want growing up:  she had two very best friends, Zelene and Thelma Baldwin, and a strong family.  The local children attended grade school up to 6th grade at school houses located in the Brookman Community and the little schoolhouse Carrie attended is supposed to be still standing on Hwy. 82 East.  When her aunt died a woman named Miss Pat would take care of her and her siblings because Bell was too upset and now had more responsibilities piled onto her already overburdened shoulders.  Miss Pat liked to play the piano and sing, but was unusually sad and cried a lot.  Carrie said she and her sister Gussie grew up crying!
            Her favorite subject in school was history, she loved reading about Magellan and the discovery of lands unknown.  Her least favorite subject was fractions, although she loved math and could recite the times’ tables eloquently.  During her school years two women contributed to her early ideals and their impact in her life remained a strong influence to present day.  Mrs. Burroughs and Mrs. Mollette taught young Carrie what it meant to be a lady and how to comport one's self thusly; however, many of the school children did not like these teachers because they were mean, but Carrie loved them.
            Other than the normal classes, Carrie took part in the music class and sewing class.  By the age of about 14 she fell in love for the first time to Clarence Spaulding.  They were childhood sweethearts but after having to go to school in town they soon parted ways, met new people, and moved on.
            From the 7th grade up, the country children had to go into town to the Colored Memorial, then to Seldon Institute for High School.  By the time Carrie got to high school age the Colored Memorial had expanded so that she could finish her schooling there and not have to go to Seldon.  But tragedy struck when Carrie was about 16 years old, the family home burned to the ground and all was lost.  Carrie and some of her siblings quit going to school because it cost a lot of money; you had to buy your own books and supplies.  Her father was adamant that they continue but Carrie could not let her family live outside so she went to Jekyll Island and got a job.  She promised her father she would go back to school after one year; she never went back to school.
            Her job on Jekyll involved housekeeping duties and maintenance for J.P. Morgan and the hotel in general.  Most of her mother’s family were employed there already:  her favorite relative Uncle Myers Hill, his brother Charles Hill, their children; it was like she never left home.  The wage earned during those years [1927] was about $5 a week, most jobs in town paid fifty cents an hour.  Carrie worked there until she was about 24 years old.
            When she was about 17 years old a friend introduced her to Herbert Roberts who would soon become her first husband.  Due to the fact that her parents could never agree on a church, Bell went to New Hope, and Sheppard to Fancy Bluff, so back and forth Carrie and family went every Sunday; it was at her father’s church that she was introduced to Herbert.  They were married at her parents house and continued working on Jekyll.
            Herbert was a manger at one of Jekyll’s golf courses, and after their marriage he returned to the island as did Carrie who continued on with her normal duties.  One day, while on the golf course, Herbert collapsed, and he was taken to the hospital; at the age of 29 he had had a stroke.  Carrie moved back to Brookman with her family to take care of her husband until he recovered, only Herbert never recovered, Carrie was left a widow at the age of 24 years.
            She was very distraught and the family ached for her, they wanted her to go out and do something to take her mind off her recent loss.  Jekyll Island wanted her back to work too; they missed her and pleaded with her to come back.  The President of the club had a niece that he needed help with and promised Carrie an easy job where she could rest when necessary; she took the job and formed a fast friendship with this little girl.  They rode one of the many redbug cars that were common on the island and played amongst the vast property of what is now the Millionaire’s Village in the historic district of Jekyll (a redbug is what we would call a go-cart today).
            The death of Herbert still plagued young Carrie and working on Jekyll was not easing her woes.  Her godmother and friend, Thelma Baldwin, wanted Carrie to come up north to Connecticut with her to get away from things for a while and had been pressuring her for some time.  Carrie finally relented, as Thelma was a very nice person who had Carrie's best wishes at heart and was only trying to help.  She went to work housekeeping and was a part time nurse’s aid for awhile.  Nearly twenty years later, at the age of 44, Carrie found love and married again to a man named Robert Robinson in Waterbury, Connecticut.  He passed away of cancer shortly after their marriage.
            Carrie always sent money and material goods home to her family, she had a moral obligation to make sure her family was okay just as they had taken care of her she would take care of them.  At the age of 50 her parents were becoming unable to care for themselves so she moved back to Brunswick.  Not much had changed in ole’ Brunswick, folks were still living in the same areas, wages were about the same, and many of her old acquaintances were still here.  Sheppard Maxwell died on Carrie’s birthday in 1966, her mother died two years later on 7 April 1968.  Both were interred in the Maxwell family cemetery on Ratcliff Road in Brookman Community.
            Although Carrie never had any children of her own, she did raise two boys, Gilbert and Morris Cash, sons of her sister Gussie Cash.  The boys have continued to help and support Carrie over the years, throwing birthday parties, and having get-togethers; just doing what good sons do for their mother.  Morris lives in Florida and has Carrie stay with him for weeks at a time. She showed me photos of him and his wife, their home, and of her enjoying her favorite pastime, swimming.
            Carrie now lives at 1524 Albany Street in Brunswick, Georgia, soon she will be moving to a retirement community as the large house is just too much for her, plus she doesn’t need all the space. When closing my interview for the day, Carrie insisted that I take some of her knick-knacks, she doesn’t want to pack up all this stuff. I picked out a small bird, and she told me to take more, so I picked out a bell, and refused any more gifts, as she has family who may want these things. To me though, they are a nice piece of someone’s history, an object to put with a person’s ideas and beliefs.

This interview was taken by Amy Hedrick on 5 March 2004.

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SMITH, James Herr
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 742-743

            JAS. HERR SMITH, cashier of the First National Bank, Brunswick, Ga., was born in York County, Penn., December 5, 1883.  He is of Scotch extraction on his father’s side and German on his mother’s.  The name was originally MacDonald, but singularly enough was changed to Smith from an incident that occurred (shortly before the battle of Boyne) in one of the local wars in Ireland.
            John and Susanna Smith came to America in 1720, settled in Chester County, Penn., and were the founders of that branch of the Smith family in this country to which our subject belongs.  The first one of the family who reached distinction was Robert.  He was a man of considerable note in the early history of the country.  His name appears in the records as a member of the committee of safety, as a member of the Pennsylvania State convention which adopted the first State constitution, and as sheriff and justice of his county.  He was also called early in 1777 to the responsible post of lieutenant of Chester County, which gave him, with the rank of colonel, the charge of raising, arming and provisioning the military contingent of his district and in every way preparing the troops to take the field.
            Our subject is a son of Robt. W. Smith, who was born in Chester County, Penn., January 10, 1805.  Subject’s mother, who was named after her mother, was a daughter of Rudolph and Martha Herr, and was born March 7, 1808.  James Herr Smith is the second of eight children who reached maturity, the others being—Henrietta F., John F., Martha H., Margretta F., Robert W. and Calvin G. (who were twins), and Chas. P.
            Most of Mr. Smith’s education has been obtained in the actual practical affairs of life, although he attended the schools at Wrightsville, Penn., where he was reared.  He was engaged in business at his native place with his father and uncles as publishers of the Star newspaper and merchants, followed these successfully for some time, and was afterwards appointed cashier of the Wrightsville Iron Co.  He came south in 1871 in the interest of Dodge & Co., lumber dealers, and was stationed at Jacksonville, Fla., being afterwards transferred to Brunswick, Ga.  He returned to Pennsylvania in 1878, and remained there until the First National Bank of Brunswick was organized, when he was recalled to take the position of cashier.  Here he has lived since.
            He married, in 1856, Miss C.D. Eberenz, daughter of Wm. Eberenz, planter of Wellsboro, Tioga County, Penn., and has had born to him four children:  Marcia E., Robt. W., Estella M. and Carrie H.
            Mr. Smith has been a very successful financier and is admirably fitted for the position he now holds.  In fact, he seems to have inherited his gift in this direction, as the family records show there have been several members who held similar financial positions.  To these qualities Mr. Smith also adds those of a christian gentleman, being a consistant [sic] member of the Presbyterian Church.

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SWINDELL, James P.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 775-776

            James P. SWINDELL was born in Liberty County, Ga., October 22, 1858.  his parents are William and Sarah (Rustin) Swindell, both natives of Georgia and living in Jesup.  William Swindell is a farmer and he and wife are the parents of two children:  Leonidas A., who is keeping a restaurant in Jesup, and the subject.
            The subject’s mother’s father, William Rustin, an Englishman, died in 1884, aged one hundred and three years.  He ran away from England and came to America, where he farmed in Georgia and was a soldier in the war of 1812.  William Swindell served as a private through the late war between the States.  He was wounded once slightly, but was never taken prisoner.
            James P. Swindell was educated in the Wayne County country schools.  When sixteen years old he engaged in the timber business, at which he continued nine years, since when he has been merchandising with good success.  He lived awhile in Brunswick; thence he went to Jesup.  In the second year of his residence in the latter place he took in a partner and the firm was styled “Swindell & Milikin” for four years; since that time “J.P. Swindell.”  He was clerk of the town council for three years; also alderman.  He was married April 15, 1884, to Miss Tillie Massey, a daughter of John Massey (see elsewhere), of Jesup.  They have two children, Massey Swindell and the second one not yet named.
            Mr. Swindell is a wide awake, enterprising merchant.  As salesman and good citizen he perhaps stands second to none in the county.

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TUCKER, O.W.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 795-796

            O.W. TUCKER, M.D., Brunswick, Ga., was born in Charlotte, N.C., November 4, 1859, and is a son of W.S. and M.A. (Clark) Tucker.  He received a fine education, which was acquired at Macon and Brunswick, and read medicine with Dr. R.F. Lester, after which he attended lectures at Savannah, where he took one course, and then attended the Atlanta Medical College, from which he graduated in March, 1885.  On his return to Brunswick he at once entered upon the practice of his profession, and has now one of the largest lists of patients of any practitioner in the city.  He rose in popular favor in a wonderfully short time, and in 1886 was elected city physician of Brunswick, was re-elected in 1887 and again in 1888.  He also served two years as house physician of the Savannah Hospital, which position gave him ample opportunity for practice and preparation for his present high position in his art.  He is a major in the uniform rank of the Knights of Pythias, and is a member of the order of Red Men.  The doctor has never married.

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ULLMAN, Hon. M.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 803-804

            HON. M. ULLMAN, president of the Oglethorpe National Bank of Brunswick, Ga., was born in Munich, Germany, June 3, 1847, and is a son of Nathan and Theresa (Neustadter) Ullman.  He was educated under private tutors in his native city, and received his business education by serving an apprenticeship in a banking house.  He left his home and landed in New York in 1868.
            He clerked one year in Pittston, Pa., and in 1869 went to Albany, Ga., where he followed the same vocation.  He left Albany for Camilla, Ga., in 1870, where for three years he was a partner of S. Mayer in the general merchandise business, but as the place was not large enough for him, he sold out there and returned to Albany.  In order to improve his business capacity he accepted a position as traveling salesman with the firm of H. Myers & Brother, wholesale tobacco and cigar dealers of Savannah.  He remained with them for three years, and returned again to Albany, and formed a partnership with Mr. S. Meyer in the cotton trade.  This business was carried on one year, when he moved to Americus, Ga., engaged in the merchandise business, and remained there until 1882, but the field not being large enough for him he moved to Brunswick, Ga., and connected himself in partnership with Messrs. S. Mayer & Glauber, wholesale grocers and liquor dealers.  In 1886 the firm was changed to S. Mayer & Ullman, who are doing a large jobbing business in their territory.
            At the organization of the First National Bank of Brunswick, Ga., Mr. Ullman was elected one of its directors, and has been one in that bank ever since.  At the organization of the Cumberland Route (The Brunswick Inland Steamboat Co.), in 1884, Mr. Ullman was elected as president, and still fills that position.  For three years he was a member of the city council.  At the organization of the Oglethorpe Hotel Co. he was elected one of its directors.  The Oglethorpe National Bank was organized July 6, 1887, and opened business August 1, that year, with a capital of $100,000, with Mr. Ullman as president, W.E. Burbage as vice-president, and John L.N. Henman as cashier.  On the first of July 1888, that bank had a surplus of $10,000 in addition to some undivided profits, and its stock selling at $115.
            July 24, 1877, Mr. Ullman married Miss Frances Mayer, daughter of Mr. S. Mayer, and there have been born to them four children:  Theresa, Gertrude, Selina and Helen, two of which, Gertrude and Selina, are living.  Mr. Ullman is a Royal Arch Mason, a Knight of Pythias, a member of the A.O.U.W., of the I.OB.B., of the American Legion of Honor and of the Hebrew Church.

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WALKER, James
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" page 810

            JAMES WALKER was born in Darien, McIntosh County, Ga., February 11, 1845.  His father was James Walker, who was born in Homer, N.Y., in June, 1818.  Mr. Walker's mother was a daughter of Reuben King, who was from Connecticut, and who settled in Darien in 1801, and began business as a merchant.  He was afterwards also a successful planter of McIntosh County.  Mr. Walker is the third in a family of five children, the others being Chas. R., Reuben K., Lillie I. and Joseph A.  Chas. R. and Lillie I. are dead; the remaining three live in Darien.  Like most men of his age Mr. Walker had hardly finished his education when he received the call to arms on the breaking out of the war.  He enlisted in company G, Fifth Georgia cavalry, which was organized in Liberty County.  He was in active service all over Florida, Georgia and South Carolina.  He was in the battle of Bentonville; was on the skirmish line ahead of Sherman, from Atlanta to Savannah, and from there into the Carolinas.  He had the honor of capturing the Union colors at the Chattahoochee and bearing them from the field.  At the close of the war Mr. Walker returned to Darien and engaged in the timber business.  He was inspector of timber for the port from 1865 to 1874, and since 1874 he has been buying and selling timber and running a general merchandise store.  He married, in 1869, Miss Mary Isabella Bealer, daughter of Dr. O.P. Bealer of South Carolina.  To this union have been born the following children:  Rueben K., Emma A., James, Chas. B., Joseph A., Sarah E., Louis A., James P. and David S.  Mr. Walker is an enterprising, public-spirited man.  He has been a member of the board of county commissioners for more than twelve years, being their chairman most of the time.  He is a Mason and a zealous member of the Presbyterian Church.

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WALKER, Richard E.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 811 & 812

            RICHARD E. WALKER, telegraph operator, express agent, etc., Jesup, Ga., was born in London, England, November 11, 1857. Richard and Emma (Newton) Walker, of Dover and Essex, Eng., were his parents. They landed in New York in 1858, and remained there until after the war closed in 1805. Richard Walker, Sr., has followed contracting since his arrival in this country and is now living at Brunswick, Ga. He and wife are nearly the same age, the latter being two days the older. These parents had twenty-one children, only four of whom are now living, viz.: Richard E.; Nellie E., wife of J.S. Raffo, a steamboat engineer of Brunswick, Ga.; Lellie E., wife of Alfred Cornell, of England, living in Brunswick, and Frances E., wife of John B. Fain, deputy postmaster of Jesup.
            Richard E. Walker was educated in Brooklyn, N.Y., Wilmington, N.C., and Brunswick, Ga., and began for himself at the age of fourteen, carpentering with his father, and since then telegraphing has been his business. He has been in Jesup since 1876, in the employ first of the Western Union, then of the S.F. & W also of the E.T., Va. & Ga. R.R., and agent of the Southern Express Company for nine years, also of the Altamaha Telegraph Company until it discontinued in November, 1887. There are none of the above corporations but would re-employ him, which is to say that he understands his business and is a pleasant, gentlemanly operator. He was alderman in Jesup for two years and refused a re-election. He was importuned to run for mayor, but could not.
            Mr. Walker was married April 9, 1885 to Miss Clara G., daughter of W.G. Wright, a farmer of Dublin, Ga., who died in 1887, aged fifty-eight. His wife died in 1887, aged forty eight. Mr. Walker is a member of the Masonic lodge of Jesup, and served as junior warden one year. Mrs. Walker is a member of the Methodist Church. Their home has been made happy in the birth of a son, Newton Wright Walker, born July 19, 1888.
            In 1876 the three sisters, later the mother, were down with yellow fever at Brunswick. The father and R.E. were at Commodore’s Island, near Darien, Ga. On hearing of their sickness, R.E. left on a sail-boat and went to the relief of the sick at home. He came through the siege all right and did not take the disease. The three sisters were taken down first, and, on convalescing, the mother was taken sick and was nursed by the daughters. This is a remarkable case, as they used only domestic remedies. Mr. Walker is well informed in his business and on the topics of the day. He has a happy home, is pleasant and social and is greatly respected and honored by a host of friends.

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WARE, Col. George M.T.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 812-813

            COL. GEORGE M.T. WARE, judge of the county court of Wayne County, Ga., was born in Fayette County, Ga., November 17, 1824.  Gen. Alexander Ware, his father, was a soldier in the war of 1812, and later a State brigadier-general.  He had charge of the McIntosh party of the Creek Indians who ceded lands to Georgia, which created a division in the tribe known as the Hostiles and the McIntosh party.  He was also a planter and an enterprising man of means, investing when and where the outlook appeared inviting.  He was killed July 7, 1836, at about the age of forty years, in Texas, by parties who belong to the “Murrell gang,” which was a band of outlaws headed by one John A. Murrell.  They originated in Tennessee during the thirties, and operated mostly in the southern States, and notably in Tennessee, Louisiana, Georgia, Alabama and the Carolinas and Mississippi and in the great Mississippi Swamp, where they had their headquarters.  Their business was mostly stealing “niggers,” selling them and stealing them again as often as possible or prudent, and then killing them, on the theory that “dead men tell no tales.”  This band was finally broken up under the surveillance of Detective Virgial A. Stewart.
            Our subject began reading law in Rome, Ga., in 1850, and was admitted to the bar in 1852, at which time also he began his practice.  His practice has been in southeastern Georgia ever since.  He has been judge of the county court now four years.  He enlisted in 1861 in an independent company of Georgia cavalry, and was in that branch of service during the entire war, and most of that service was on the coast and islands of Georgia, though some of it was in Florida, Alabama, and at Atlanta and north Georgia.  He was also in the Fourth Georgia cavalry which served temporarily under Wheeler, Morgan, Avery and Ferguson, each for a time, then went flanking along after Sherman on his march through Georgia, and was among the last who crossed the pontoon bridge that spanned the river at Savannah.  It was being torn up on the morning the Union troops entered that city.  It was put there by the Confederates for the C.S.A. forces to cross over into South Carolina.  The judge served as lieutenant most of the time.  When the war closed he went to practicing law at Blackshear without a copper.  He remained there until 1869, and had done well when he lost everything by fire.  He left then for Brunswick and took charge of the city academy there, a position which was tendered him without solicitation.  He had good success and remained there until 1874, when he left on account of the health of his wife and child, and went to Jesup, where he has been ever since.  He was married in 1864, in Blackshear, to Miss Isabella, daughter of Elias and Nancy (Strickland) Stewart, both natives of Georgia.  The colonel’s home has been made happy in the birth of one child, Kate, now senior in the Wesleyan Female College at Macon.  Both parents and child are members of the Methodist Church.  The colonel has been an active Mason for nearly forty years.  He has filled all the offices in the Blue Lodge, Council, Chapter, etc.  He began life without capital and it seems that life has, thus far, been mostly made up of successive disappointments, reverses and misfortunes, and, no doubt, he lives too much in the bright spots of the long ago—in the dead past—and chafes under the thought of “what might have been.”
            In the murder case of David Williams, a few years ago, a Jesup paper of that date says:  “the colonel made the opening speech for the defense, a masterpiece in its way.”  The State replied.  When Col. Bohanna, for the defense, arose for the concluding plea, he was taken with a fit and had to be carried out.  Then Col. Ware was left to make another plea on the same case and right nobly came the colonel to the task.  With heart aglow and with beaming eye and tender voice, he plead for the life of his client, until the stern countenance of the judge relented, jury melted, lawyers wondered, and men who thought that the defendant should die like a dog, said his life should be spared.  Even the dogged visage of the defendant lighted up with a gleam of hope.  It is said this effort was never equaled in Wayne County court-house.  Though not a word of testimony was or could be offered for the defense, yet defendant escaped the extreme penalty of the law.

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WAY, Edward F.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" page 825

            EDWARD F. WAY, physician and surgeon, Hawkinsville, Ga., was born in Liberty County, Ga., November 9, 1827.  His parents are Edward and Mary (Leod) Way, both natives of Georgia.  The father was a farmer and clerk of the superior court for over twenty years, and was also a private in the war of 1812.  He died in 1859, aged sixty-five, and the mother of the subject died in 1853, aged forty-five.  These parents had three children:  Edward F. (subject), Mary (deceased at the age of twenty-one), and Nathaniel Way.  Our subject prepared for the senior year in Oxford College.  At the age of eighteen he began teaching and continued two years.  The next four years he read medicine before he attended lectures, practiced several years, then went to Charleston (S.C.) Medical College, from which he graduated in the class of 1854.  He began practicing in Twiggs County, Ga., in 1855, thence moved to Longstreet and practiced eight years.  He then retired for several years, having been overworked.  He had kept from four to six horses going, and did not stay with his family an hour in a week.  He moved to Hawkinsville in 1867, and has been very successful in his practice since.  He was married in 1847 to Miss Sarah Shine, daughter of Daniel W. Shine, a farmer, who served in the legislature many years, and was in the war of 1812 as captain; he died in 1870, at the age of eighty-six.  His wife died in 1861, aged fifty-two.  Subject’s wife’s mother’s maiden name was Nancy Glenn.  Her husband was Robert Glenn.  Our subject and wife are the parents of eleven children; one son and three daughters are still living.  Mrs. Way’s brothers and sisters are:  Daniel, deceased; Sarah; John, deceased; Mary Ella; Daniel, deceased at twenty-five years; his wife’s name was Hattie McNair; John, deceased at forty-seven years; Mary, wife of G.W. Falk, living on a farm in Twiggs County; Ella, died 1883, aged thirty-nine years.  Doctor and wife are both members of the Baptist Church.  The doctor is also a Mason.  Dr. Way began life poor, but through industry and economy, he has accumulated a good competence.

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WAY, Walter A.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 825-826

            WALTER A. WAY was born in Liberty County, Ga., January 19, 1843.  His father, Dr. Samuel Way, was also a native of Liberty County, having been born there in the year 1810, and was long a prominent physician in his section.  Mr. Way’s grandfather, John Way, was likewise a native of Liberty County, was a large and successful planter, and was a descendant of Parmenus Way, whose name appears among the signers of the Declaration of Independence.  Mr. Way’s mother’s maiden name was Olivia T. Axson, a native of Liberty County, and daughter of Dr. William Axson, originally from South Carolina, and afterwards surgeon in the war of 1812 and in the Mexican war.  Mr. Way is the eldest of five living children, the others being:  William J., Anna, wife of J.L. Harden; Samuel A. and Richard T.  He was educated at the Oglethorpe University of Georgia, graduating in 1860.  In the spring of 1861, on the breaking out of the war, he enlisted in the Liberty County independent troop of cavalry, which company, with others, formed the Fifth Georgia cavalry.  He remained in this command till August, 1863, when he was transferred to company I, Twenty-first Georgia battalion of cavalry.  This battalion, with others, formed the Seventh Georgia cavalry, with which Mr. Way served, mostly through Virginia, till the close of the war.  During his term of service he was promoted to the position of second lieutenant, and he held this position when he was mustered out.  On returning home Mr. Way went to work to repair his wasted fortunes, engaging in planting and also in general merchandising, which he followed till January, 1872.  He read law in the meantime and was admitted to the bar at Hinesville, Ga., in April, 1872.  In 1873 he located in Darien, Ga., and began the practice of his profession, which he followed successfully till January, 1881.  he then moved to Atlanta, continuing in his profession there till September, 1886, when he moved to Orlando, Fla.
            Mr. Way, in November, 1866, married Miss Alice S. Yulee, a daughter of Elias Yulee, of Washington, D.C.  Mrs. Way is a niece of Hon. David Yulee, late U.S. senator from Florida, and is also a relative of the late Judah P. Benjamin through her mother, whose maiden name was Rachel Benjamin.  To this union have been born three children:  Samuel Yulee, William Finley, and Nannie RosalieMr. Way is a prominent member of the Presbyterian Church, of which also his entire family are members, and he is a Democrat whose opinion is of weight in the councils of his party.

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WHITFIELD, Bolling
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" page 840

            HON. BOLLING WHITFIELD, son of William H. and Maria C. (Breedlove) Whitfield, was born in Milledgeville, Ga., October 21, 1850.  Wm. H. Whitfield was born in Jasper County, Ga., in 1821, was a son of Matthew Whitfield, of Scotch-Irish descent; was an extensive planter, and died in 1869.  His wife, Mrs. Maria C. Whitfield, was born in Putnam County, Ga., and was a daughter of Benjamin Breedlove, who was of English extraction.  Mr. and Mrs. William H. Whitfield’s children, still living, are four in number and are named:  Matthew C., John B., Bolling and Robert.
            Bolling Whitfield graduated from the University of Georgia in 1870, began the practice of law at Monticello, and at once rose into popular favor.  He has been delegate to several Democratic State conventions, including the famous Colquitt-Norwood convention, and was appointed county judge of Jasper County by Gov. Colquitt in 1878; he filled this office until 1888, when he resigned and settled in Brunswick, in May of that year, and formed a law partnership with Hon. Alfred J. Crovatt.  The firm of Crovatt & Whitfield have achieved a most enviable reputation for integrity and legal acumen, and have met with success in their practice that has been satisfactorily lucrative.  Mr. Whitfield is the present chairman of the Democratic executive committee of Glynn County, Ga., and in 1886 was elected city attorney of Brunswick, the county seat, which office he still holds.
            In 1874 he married Miss Georgia H., daughter of Hon. George A. Brown, of Americus, Ga.  Mrs. Whitfield became the mother of four children:  Lilian, Essie, Eugene and Lavergne, but died in September, 1885, while yet a young woman, greatly loved by her interesting family, and by it deeply lamented.  Mr. Whitfield belongs to only one secret order, the Knights of Pythias.

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WILKINS, William T.
"Biographical Souvenir of the States of Georgia and Florida" pages 848-849

            WILLIAM T. WILKINS, merchant and farmer, was born in eastern Virginia, September 4, 1853.  He is the son of Josiah and Georgiana (Skinner) Wilkins, natives of Nansemond [sic] County, Va., and the former a well-to-do farmer.  They are the parents of nine children, all of whom are living, viz.:  W.T.; T.S., merchandising in Jesup; Bosheba, wife of Adolphus Baker, living in Suffolk, Va.; J.H., merchandising in Jesup; Anna L., teacher in public and private schools; Georgia, attending Cherry Grove Academy; Willis J., Mattie, and Luther, attending the county school.  Josiah Wilkins served in the war four years, receiving only one slight wound.  He enlisted in 1861 and was promoted to first lieutenant before the war closed.  He was in Mahone’s division and was discharged just a few months before Lee’s surrender.  Both he and his wife are members of the Christian Church.
            William T. Wilkins was educated in Nansemond [sic] County Spring Hill Academy, and began merchandising at the age of twenty-one years in Suffolk, where he continued two years.  He then merchandised in Brunswick, Ga., but went to Jesup, Ga., in 1876, to escape yellow fever, and did not return.  He engaged in saw-milling business on the Altamaha river three years, but on being burned out located in Jesup, and carried on merchandising and farming, in which he has been very successful.  He has been a member of the alderman’s board six years and was coroner of Wayne County in 1884-85.
            Mr. Wilkins was married in 1879 to Miss Margaret E. Ames, daughter of Edward and Nancy J. (Riddick) Ames, natives of Nansemond County, Va.  Edward Ames (deceased) was a truck farmer.  Mr. Wilkins and wife are parents of four children, viz.:  Katie, Elizabeth (deceased), Georgia E., and Nannie J. (deceased).  Mr. Wilkins is a member of the I.O.O.F. and K. of P., and Mrs. Wilkins is a member of the Christian Church.  Mr. Wilkins is an enterprising and successful business man, and a good illustration of the result when honesty, application, and economy are kept in view.

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WRIGHT, G.W.
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 990 & 991.

            G.W. Wright, deceased, merchant and farmer, Sterling Station, Glynn Co., Georgia, a son of James B. and Ann (Burnett) Wright, natives of Glynn County, was born in Glynn County 25 October 1829.  His father was a son of Maj. Samuel Wright, a British officer during the war of 1812, who then made the acquaintance of a lady whom he, after peace was proclaimed, returned to the United States and married.  James B. Wright died in 1865, and his widow, aged eighty-four years, died in 1879.  Mr. Wright was thrown on his own resources when fifteen years of age, followed farming and farm-managing before the war; and his services in the last named capacity commanding good salaries, enabled him to acquire a fairly handsome estate.  In the spring of 1861 he enlisted in the 4th Georgia Cavalry and was made orderly sergeant of his company, an office, however, which he did not long retain.  Being regarded as a very cool and brave man, and an unusually good woodsman, he was principally employed in scout work, serving as such in Tennessee and Georgia.  He was in the battles of Atlanta and Jonesboro, and when the end came he was guarding a railway bridge at Doctortown, Wayne Co., Georgia, where he surrendered and was paroled in 1865.  His most thrilling and impressive experiences during the war were two narrow escapes from death--one when a bullet grazed him in front, and another when a bullet grazed him in the back, each passing above the saddle; and on one occasion when all he had to eat for four days was one small "nubbin of corn" about four inches long.  When the war ended he had lost everything except his land and a yoke of oxen.  Going bravely to work, good farm management and judicious investments accumulated a fair fortune, but he could not be considered wealthy.  Mr. Wright had a general merchandise store, carried a large and well assorted stock, owned 5,000 acres of land, and was a stockholder in the Southern bank of the state of Georgia, in Savannah.  Unambitious as to political honors he declined offers to place him in office.  Mr. Wright was married to Miss Clifford Burnett in 1851, by whom he had one child; and his wife died soon afterward.  The child, a daughter, died also at sixteen years of age.  In 1857 Mr. Wright was married to Miss Annie E. Taylor, daughter of Silas W. and Marguerite (Lowery) Taylor, natives of Glynn County, and this second union was blessed with nine children:  G.W., Jr.; J.S.; Charlton; Mary Letitia (Mrs. P.W. Fleming); Ada; Daisy; Bessie; Maggie; and one which died in infancy.  Mr. Wright was a devoted member of the Protestant Episcopal Church, of which his bereaved widow is also and exemplary member.

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WRIGHT, J.B.
"Memoirs of Georgia" Vol. I-II by the Southern Historical Association 1895; page 990.

            J.B. Wright, merchant, St. Simons Island, Glynn Co., Georgia, a son of M.C.B. and Elizabeth (Anderson) Wright, was born in Glynn County, 5 August 1853.  His parents were respectively of English and Scotch descent; both were born in Glynn County.  Major Samuel Wright, the ancestor of this family, came to Georgia with Gen Oglethorpe, and first settled in Frederica, on St. Simons Island.  Mr. Wright's father was at one time sheriff of Glynn County; his mother died about 1884 aged fifty-five years, his father at an earlier date.  J.B. Wright began life for himself at the early age of fourteen, with no means and no aid from his father; but he managed to wrest from his hard conditions of life a very handsome property.  He owns three-fourths of the steamer "Hessix", and manages its business.  He was married to Lizzie M. Earle, of Brooklyn, New York, in 1879, by whom he has had three children; but only one, Mary Elizabeth, is now living.  Mrs. Wright is a Catholic.  Mr. Wright is a Mason and enjoys the esteem of all who know him.

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