Benjamin & Nancy Hart

Benjamin Hart and his wife, Ann, who was the daughter of Thomas and Rebecca (Alexander) Morgan, at one time lived in Brunswick.

Benjamin came from North Carolina to Georgia, and lived in Elbert County prior to the Revolutionary War, and at the outbreak he enlisted.

While her husband was away, Nancy, as Ann was known, became a nationally acclaimed heroine by capturing several Tories on her property who were demanding food.

At the close of the war they came to Brunswick, settling in the area now known as Wright Square.  The earliest found record of Benj. was in the Tax Digest of 1794 where he returned 15 slaves for taxes.

The land he owned was a 50 acre tract located in the southeastern part of the city, beginning at a stake in the edge of the marsh (on the Boulevard) and running S 63 degrees E (line on the drain) to the corner of Cochran and First Avenues; thence down First Avenue to a "chinkapin" within a few feet of the corner of Carpenter Street; thence S 19 1/2 degrees E (being practically the line of Carpenter St.) along the side of a ditch to a cedar post in the edge of the marsh and, following the edge of the marsh, to the point of beginning.

It is assumed that Benj. died about 1801 to about 1802 as his will was filed in this county in the latter part of 1801 and his estate appraisal was entered 29 February 1802.  His wife presumably left with a son, John, to live in Clark Co., Alabama.  Other sons, Thomas and Benj. Jr., may have stayed in Glynn County.  Nancy and son John, and his family, moved from Alabama on the Tombigbee River to Kentucky.  John Hart died in 1821 and Nancy continued to live with her daughter-in-law.  Nancy was buried in the Hart graveyard in Henderson, Kentucky.

His grave is unmarked but is believed to be buried in Wright Square, which was the public burying ground at that time, in the northwest corner directly in front of the J.M. Burnett home.

 

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